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Latest Ellesmere Island Stories

Ancient Fossils Of Tough Fish Shed Light On Evolution Of Four-Footed Animals
2013-03-28 08:08:22

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Describing life in the Devonian period in what is now northern Canada, Dr. Ted Daeschler of Drexel University said, "We call it a 'fish-eat-fish world,' an ecosystem where you really needed to escape predation.” The famous fossil fish species Tiktaalik roseae lived in this environment 375 million years ago. Daeschler, associate professor at Drexel University in the Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science,...

Greenland Glacier Loses An Ice Island Twice The Size Of Manhattan
2012-07-18 07:11:16

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Andreas Muenchow, associate professor of physical ocean science and engineering in University of Delaware´s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, reports the calving of an island two times the size of Manhattan on July 16, 2012, in his “Icy Seas” blog. Muenchow credits Trudy Wohleben of the Canadian Ice Service for first noticing the fracture. MODIS, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard...

Canadian Arctic Ice Shelves Vanishing
2011-10-01 07:30:35

One of Canada's Arctic ice shelves has virtually vanished, and several others have diminished significantly over the summer, according to a pair of the nation's foremost experts on the subject. Luke Copland, an associate professor in the University of Ottawa's geography department, and Derek Mueller, an assistant professor at Carleton University's geography and environmental studies department, co-authored research reporting the disintegration of both the Serson Ice Shelf and the Ward Hunt...

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2011-03-18 06:30:00

By Lily Whiteman, National Science Foundation Newly discovered ancient, mummified trees may reveal clues about future ecosystem responses to climate change When in Quttinirpaaq National Park in the Canadian Arctic, Ohio State University Earth scientist Joel Barker initially spotted some pieces of dead trees scattered on the barren ground near a glacier. Immediately, he knew he had found something akin to a looking glass peering into the Arctic's ecological past. The Hazen Plateau on Ellesmere...

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2010-12-15 14:32:30

Written by Pam Frost Gorder, Ohio State University The northernmost mummified forest ever found in Canada is revealing how plants struggled to endure a long-ago global cooling. Researchers believe the trees -- buried by a landslide and exquisitely preserved 2 to 8 million years ago -- will help them predict how today's Arctic will respond to global warming. They also suspect that many more mummified forests could emerge across North America as Arctic ice continues to melt. As the wood is...

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2010-08-24 15:13:32

A new study of the High Arctic climate roughly 50 million years ago led by the University of Colorado at Boulder helps to explain how ancient alligators and giant tortoises were able to thrive on Ellesmere Island well above the Arctic Circle, even as they endured six months of darkness each year. The new study, which looked at temperatures during the early Eocene period 52 to 53 million years ago, also has implications for the impacts of future climate change as Arctic temperatures continue...

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2010-06-30 07:14:49

A new study shows the Arctic climate system may be more sensitive to greenhouse warming than previously thought, and that current levels of Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide may be high enough to bring about significant, irreversible shifts in Arctic ecosystems. Led by the University of Colorado at Boulder, the international study indicated that while the mean annual temperature on Ellesmere Island in the High Arctic during the Pliocene Epoch 2.6 to 5.3 million years ago was about 34 degrees...

2009-06-03 15:36:12

U.S. scientists have determined how high arctic mammals lived about 54 million years ago in a study said to be important in view of Earth's climate change. University of Colorado-Boulder researchers said ancestors of tapirs and ancient cousins of rhinos living above the Arctic Circle 53 million years ago endured six months of darkness each year in a mild climate that featured lush, swampy forests. Assistant Professor Jaelyn Eberle, who led the researchers, said the study shows several...

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2009-06-01 13:39:42

Ancestors of tapirs and ancient cousins of rhinos living above the Arctic Circle 53 million years ago endured six months of darkness each year in a far milder climate than today that featured lush, swampy forests, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. CU-Boulder Assistant Professor Jaelyn Eberle said the study shows several varieties of prehistoric mammals as heavy as 1,000 pounds each lived on what is today Ellesmere Island near Greenland on a summer diet of...

2008-12-17 19:21:30

This year is stacking up to be Earth's 10th warmest in 158 years of record keeping, U.N. officials said Wednesday in New York. The U.N. Worldwide Meteorological Organization said the combined sea-surface and land-surface air temperature worldwide for 2008 was 0.56 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1961-1990 annual average of 57.2 degrees Fahrenheit. The U.N. meteorological agency noted, however, the average was slightly lower than previous years this century. The organization said La Nina, a...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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