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Latest Elwood V. Jensen Stories

2012-05-18 11:39:57

Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine have been awarded more than $5 million from Susan G. Komen for the Cure for three new breast cancer research grants, including a prestigious Komen Promise Grant. Komen Promise Grant The Komen Promise Grant is a three-year award for a total of $4,066, 940 to study restoration of endocrine therapy sensitivity in recurrent breast cancers. The grant was awarded to principal investigator Dr. Bert O'Malley, chair of molecular and cellular biology at...

2011-09-21 15:12:35

Medical researchers at the University of Leeds have come a step closer to understanding how to stop breast cancers from coming back. Their findings, published in the International Journal of Cancer, suggest that some novel drugs that are being developed to tackle other cancers should be considered as a future treatment for breast cancer too. Hormone therapies, such as tamoxifen, that target a protein responsible for tumor growth, have dramatically improved the treatment of breast...

2011-08-23 10:25:56

2 studies on estrogen hormones published in Molecular Endocrinology University of Houston (UH) researchers have their sights set on developing possible treatments for breast and colon cancer. In two separate, yet related, studies published in the June and August issues of the journal Molecular Endocrinology, professor Cecilia Williams and her team at the Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling (CNRCS) explored the role of estrogen hormones in potentially treating and preventing...

2011-06-03 12:32:48

Patterns of radiation usage in breast conserving therapy for women 70 years and older with stage I breast cancer are changing: more women are opting for radioactive implants and those with estrogen positive tumors are opting out of radiation therapy, according to an abstract being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago by Thomas Jefferson University Hospital researchers on Saturday, June 4. The abstract (#6094) received an ASCO Merit Award. In another...

2010-04-21 13:22:54

Washington, DC -- For women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancers, treatment after initial surgery is straightforward: a daily dose of an anti-hormone drug will block the tumor from fuel needed for growth, and keep the breast cancer at bay. The treatments work like gangbusters at first, but after time, many tumors become resistant to therapy. With no other treatment options, the cancer grows again and eventually spreads. Teams of scientists from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive...

2009-07-15 08:30:00

Researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have identified a protein relationship that may be an ideal treatment target for ER+ breast cancer. The study was reported in the July 15 issue of Cancer Research.DACH1, a cell fate determination factor protein, prevents cancer cell proliferation by repressing the function of estrogen receptorsï in breast cancer, the researchers found. However, they also found that as the presence of DACH1 decreases in breast cancer, the...

2008-09-05 06:00:05

Agendia, a molecular cancer diagnostics company, has launched TargetPrint, a new diagnostic test that allows physicians to quantitatively determine the gene expression levels of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in breast cancer tumor biopsies. According to the company, the accurate measurement of these receptors is of paramount importance in planning treatment of breast cancer patients after surgery and assists physicians and patients...

2006-04-11 15:10:00

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Advances in chemotherapy are proving a life-saving boon for women whose breast cancer has spread to the lymph nodes but who have tumors that are not fueled by estrogen, a study said on Tuesday. At the same the time the study found that women who have the more common kind of tumor, whose growth is affected by estrogen, are helped by the drug tamoxifen but may get only modest benefits from chemotherapy. The findings, published in this week's Journal of the American Medical...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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