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Latest Emory University Stories

2010-11-16 21:13:46

With the help of babies and more than 5,000 of their diapers, Emory University researchers have developed an accurate, noninvasive method to determine estrogen levels in infants. The method, previously used in nonhuman primates, will allow researchers to learn more about the association between estrogen levels in human infants and their long-term reproductive development as well as the development of sex-specific behaviors, such as toy preference or cognitive differences. What's more, the...

2010-11-15 13:01:40

People who sleep poorly or do not get enough sleep have higher levels of inflammation, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, researchers have found. Data from a recent study are scheduled to be presented Sunday, Nov. 14 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago by Alanna Morris, MD, a cardiology fellow at Emory University School of Medicine. The results come from surveying 525 middle-aged people participating in the Morehouse-Emory Partnership to Eliminate...

2010-11-15 12:31:13

Neuroscience researchers from the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, will present a wide range of research topics at the Society for Neuroscience's 40th annual meeting in San Diego, Nov. 13-17, 2010. The information below is a representation of the neuroscience research Yerkes scientists will be discussing. To learn more about ongoing research and scientific resources available at the Yerkes Research Center and the other seven national primate research centers, please...

2010-11-12 00:00:43

Emory Healthcare, the Emory Breast Center and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University partner to launch comprehensive website, blog, and contest around breast health. Atlanta, GA (Vocus) November 11, 2010 The largest, most comprehensive health care system in the state of Georgia, Emory Healthcare, is launching various web-based resources to promote breast cancer awareness and breast health beyond the month of October. Emory Healthcare, its clinical breast health division, the Emory...

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2010-11-04 12:45:00

Researchers have identified the deletion of a genomic region on chromosome 17 as a significant risk factor for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. A mutation of one of the genes in the deleted interval already is a known cause of renal cysts and diabetes syndrome (RCAD). The research, by an international collaboration of scientists led by Emory University, will be published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Lead author of the study is Daniel Moreno-De-Luca, MD, MSc,...

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2010-11-04 10:11:20

Was it the evolution of the hand, or of the brain, that enabled prehistoric toolmakers to make the leap from simple flakes of rock to a sophisticated hand axe? A new study finds that the ability to plan complex tasks was key. The research, published today in the Public Library of Science journal PLoS ONE, is the first to use a cyber data glove to precisely measure the hand movements of stone tool making, and compare the results to brain activation. "Making a hand axe appears to require...

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2010-10-27 10:30:00

Researchers conclude more, not less, surveillance funding needed Cutting surveillance for mosquito-borne diseases would likely translate into an exponential increase in both the number of human cases and the health costs when a disease outbreak occurs, according to an analysis by Emory University. The Public Library of Science (PLoS) published the research, led by Emory disease ecologist Gonzalo Vazquez-Prokopec, Oct. 26. "Our analysis shows that halting mosquito surveillance can increase the...

2010-10-12 18:13:41

A new class of compounds identified by researchers at Emory University School of Medicine could be developed into drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia. The compounds enhance signaling by molecules in the brain called NMDA receptors, which scientists believe are functioning at low levels in people with schizophrenia. Led by Stephen Traynelis, PhD, professor of pharmacology, a team of Emory researchers sifted through thousands of chemicals and found one, called CIQ, which could selectively...

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2010-10-12 08:00:00

Monarch butterflies appear to use medicinal plants to treat their offspring for disease, research by biologists at Emory University shows. Their findings were published online Oct. 6 in the journal Ecology Letters. "We have shown that some species of milkweed, the larva's food plants, can reduce parasite infection in the monarchs," says Jaap de Roode, the evolutionary biologist who led the study. "And we have also found that infected female butterflies prefer to lay their eggs on plants that...

2010-09-30 20:12:56

As researchers and policymakers work toward an effective HIV vaccine in a constrained global economy, cost-effective prevention strategies such as Couples Voluntary Counseling and Testing (CVCT) must take a larger role in efforts to decrease the rates of HIV/AIDS in Africa, says Emory University HIV/AIDS vaccine researcher Susan Allen, MD, MPH. Allen, who has worked to combat the AIDS epidemic in Africa for more than 25 years, highlighted the value of CVCT and other cost-effective HIV...


Latest Emory University Reference Libraries

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2011-04-18 23:26:47

Sonny Carter was a physician, professional soccer player, naval officer, and NASA astronaut. He was born Manley Lanier Carter, Jr. on August 15, 1947 in Macon, Georgia. He graduated from Lanier High School in 1965 and then went to on study at Emory University, where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry in 1969. While at Emory, Carter played collegiate soccer and ran track. He was team captain and most valuable player of the soccer team during his senior season. In 1970, Carter...

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