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Latest Emory University Stories

2009-11-17 10:40:03

Judging from the number of juices and teas advertised as containing antioxidants, consumers are aware of the dangers of oxidative stress. But what is the best way to measure it "“ and fight it? Doctors at Emory University School of Medicine have identified a substance in the blood that may be useful in predicting an individual's risk for heart disease. The substance is cystine, an oxidized form of the amino acid cysteine and an indirect measure of oxidative stress. In a study of more...

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2009-11-16 08:05:00

Researchers at Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed microscopic polymer beads that can deliver an antioxidant enzyme made naturally by the body into the heart. Injecting the enzyme-containing particles into rats' hearts after a simulated heart attack reduced the number of dying cells and resulted in improved heart function days later. Michael Davis, PhD, is presenting the results Sunday evening at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in...

2009-11-11 17:15:47

Emory researchers present findings on worksite wellness programs and norovirus at American Public Health Association Meeting Emory University Rollins School of Public Health researchers will present Nov. 11 on a range of topics at the American Public Health Association's annual meeting in Philadelphia, including a study that found reduced absenteeism among employees participating in a large-scale worksite wellness program. Additional public health research findings from Emory scientists are...

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2009-11-11 07:01:56

Veterinary leap forward through collaboration with Zoo Atlanta, Georgia Tech, Emory University and a 300-pound great ape Zoo Atlanta recently became the first zoological institution in the world to obtain voluntary blood pressure readings from a gorilla. This groundbreaking stride was made possible by the Gorilla Tough Cuff, a blood pressure reading system devised through partnership with the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. Created...

2009-11-10 18:20:26

Emory researchers present findings on ER wait times and adolescent risk-taking behavior at American Public Health Association Meeting Emory University Rollins School of Public Health researchers will present Nov. 10 on a range of topics at the American Public Health Association's annual meeting in Philadelphia, including a study that examined compliance with national recommendations that a physician screen chest pain patients within 10 minutes of their arrival to the Emergency Department...

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2009-11-03 09:32:14

Researchers have developed an improved version of an enzyme that degrades the dense scar tissue that forms when the central nervous system is damaged. By digesting the tissue that blocks re-growth of damaged nerves, the improved enzyme "“ and new system for delivering it "“ could facilitate recovery from serious central nervous system injuries. The enzyme, chrondroitinase ABC (chABC), must be supplied to the damaged area for at least two weeks following injury to fully degrade...

2009-10-26 16:15:33

In recent years, women, particularly younger women, experienced larger improvements in hospital mortality after myocardial infarction (MI) than men, according to a study published in the Oct. 26, 2009 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. Over the last decade several studies showed that younger women, but not older ones, are more likely to die in the hospital after MI than age-matched men. A team of Emory University researchers examined whether such mortality differences have declined in...

2009-10-19 14:01:09

New approaches include adding vitamin D and using water-soluble analogues As doctors begin to test progesterone for traumatic brain injury at sites across the country, researchers are looking ahead to optimizing the hormone's effectiveness. Two abstracts summarizing Emory research on progesterone are being presented at the 2009 Society for Neuroscience (SFN) meeting in Chicago. A multisite phase III clinical trial called ProTECT III will begin to evaluate progesterone's effectiveness for...

2009-10-17 09:56:28

Emory University researchers have identified the first fish known to have switched from ultraviolet vision to violet vision, or the ability to see blue light. The discovery is also the first example of an animal deleting a molecule to change its visual spectrum. Their findings on scabbardfish, linking molecular evolution to functional changes and the possible environmental factors driving them, were published Oct. 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "This...

2009-10-16 14:29:00

BOSTON, Oct. 16 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN chief medical correspondent, author and neurosurgeon, will open the 2009-2010 Bunker Hill Community College "Compelling Conversations" speaker series. Gupta will speak at 1 p.m., Tuesday, October 27, 2009, in the A300 auditorium. A leader in the national dialogue on healthcare, Dr. Gupta contributes frequent stories to the CNN television shows "American Morning" and "House Call with Sanjay Gupta." Based in Atlanta, GA,...


Latest Emory University Reference Libraries

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2011-04-18 23:26:47

Sonny Carter was a physician, professional soccer player, naval officer, and NASA astronaut. He was born Manley Lanier Carter, Jr. on August 15, 1947 in Macon, Georgia. He graduated from Lanier High School in 1965 and then went to on study at Emory University, where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry in 1969. While at Emory, Carter played collegiate soccer and ran track. He was team captain and most valuable player of the soccer team during his senior season. In 1970, Carter...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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