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Latest Endochondral ossification Stories

Brain Size Influences Development Of Individual Cranial Bones
2014-04-10 15:33:59

University of Zurich Embryonic development in animals – except mice and rats – remains largely unexplored. For a research project at the University of Zurich, the embryos of 134 species of animal were studied non-invasively for the first time using microcomputer imaging, thus yielding globally unique data. The embryos studied came from museum collections all over the world. The international team of researchers headed by Marcelo Sánchez-Villagra especially studied cranial formation...

2012-02-15 21:34:49

Orthopaedic researchers take the road less traveled A person has a tumor removed from her femur. A soldier is struck by an improvised explosive device and loses a portion of his tibia. A child undergoes chemotherapy for osteosarcoma but part of the bone dies as a result. Every year, millions of Americans sustain fractures that don't heal or lose bone that isn't successfully grafted. But a study presented at the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) 2012 Annual Meeting in San Francisco...

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2010-05-25 09:53:02

University of Rochester Medical Center scientists discovered a defect in cellular pathways that provides a new explanation for the earliest stages of abnormal skull development in newborns, known as craniosynostosis. Mutations of the WNT and FGF signaling pathways set off a cascade of events that regulate bone formation at the stem cell level, according to the article, published May 25, 2010, in the journal Science Signaling. "Our work contributes to the overall knowledge of the complex...

2008-06-21 03:00:23

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - Medical researchers at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill announced Monday that they have made strides in the technology to rebuild damaged bone tissue using stem cells. The research team, led by Dr. Anna Spagnoli, an associate professor of pediatrics at the university, derived the stem cells from bone marrow samples to locate and repair broken bones in mice. Now the work is poised to move to humans. "What we have done here is shown a reason to move to a...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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