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Latest Endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia Stories

2013-07-26 11:44:47

Scientists at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have discovered a function of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN that helps explain why certain promising therapies fail in many cancer patients, a finding that could aid in delivering tailored, personalized cancer medicine based on an individual's genetics. The research, published online today in Science, "increases understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of PTEN, which is known to be defective in as many as half of all advanced...

2013-06-06 23:03:05

A novel gene variant found in human and animal tissue may be a promising treatment for cancer, including breast and brain cancer, according to scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. New York, NY (PRWEB) June 06, 2013 A novel gene variant found in human and animal tissue may be a promising treatment for cancer, including breast and brain cancer, according to scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The variant, called PTEN-long, may contribute to a...

Genomics Help Improve Endometrial Cancer Treatment
2013-05-02 07:54:13

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Adding genomics-based testing to standard patient evaluation process could drastically alter the recommended treatment program for women with endometrial cancer, as well as the classification of that form of cancerous tumor, claims research published Thursday in the journal Nature. As part of the study, investigators from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network analyzed endometrial cancer tumor samples from 373 patients...

2012-03-21 21:26:26

Low bone density medications, such as Fosamax, Boniva and Actonel, may have a protective effect for endometrial cancer, according to a study at Henry Ford Hospital. Endometrial cancer affects more than 45,000 women a year in the U.S., usually in their 60s, although it can occur before 40. A type of uterine cancer, it's the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic cancer, and there is no known preventive medication for women at high risk of developing it. "The results of the study suggest...

2012-03-08 06:12:15

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — We dream of a world where we can eat whatever we like and not worry about the consequences, like weight gain and health issues, and now we might be a step closer. A new study shows mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow and also live longer. In a case study, researchers studied a tumor suppressor commonly lost in human cancers. Mice were given an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene, known as Pten. Not only...

2012-03-06 23:40:22

This result, obtained after five years' research, is published in leading journal Cell Metabolism. The authors, led by Manuel Serrano (CNIO), believe it will open the door to new therapeutic options not only against cancer, but against obesity and even the ageing process. The team has also demonstrated that a synthetic compound developed in-house produces the same anti-obesity benefits in animals as the study gene. Their findings add new weight to a hypothesis that is gaining currency...

2012-03-06 23:05:23

In a perfect world, we could eat to our heart's content without sacrificing our health and good looks, and now it appears that maybe we can. Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to the report in the March issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either. One of the animals' youthful secrets is hyperactive brown...

2012-01-26 12:57:23

Researchers at Queen´s University have identified a possible cause for the loss of a tumour suppressor gene (known as PTEN) that can lead to the development of more aggressive forms of prostate cancer. “This discovery gives us a greater understanding of how aggressive prostate cancer develops because we now have some insight into the mechanism by which the PTEN gene is destroyed,” says Jeremy Squire, a professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine....

2011-06-06 12:52:41

ASCO Abstract #10504. Contrary to what many oncologists had thought, a tumor suppressor protein known as PTEN does not reduce the effectiveness of the breast cancer drug Herceptin, according to a study by Mayo Clinic and North Central Cancer Research Group (NCCTG) investigators. The study, which looked at tumors from 1,802 patients enrolled in the NCCTG N9831 clinical trial, found that patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and had either a loss of PTEN functioning or normal PTEN activity...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'