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Latest Endoplasmic reticulum Stories

2014-07-10 12:16:31

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council A network of signals active in almost all types of cancer sends the protein factories in our cells into overdrive, and may help fuel a tumor's uncontrolled growth, new research suggests. Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, identified a molecular trigger responsible for ratcheting up activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) – the cellular factory that makes the building blocks cancer cells need to keep...

2014-06-09 10:48:48

Brookhaven National Laboratory Structure of membrane protein that plays a role in signaling cell death could be new target for anticancer drugs Sometimes a cell has to die—when it's done with its job or inflicted with injury that could otherwise harm an organism. Conversely, cells that refuse to die when expected can lead to cancer. So scientists interested in fighting cancer have been keenly interested in learning the details of "programmed cell death." They want to understand what...

Mitochondrial Ribosome Deciphered
2014-01-24 13:37:28

ETH Zurich Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich have deciphered the structure of part of the ribosome found in mitochondria, the power plants of the cell. The scientists were able to benefit from advancements in the field of electron microscopy and capture images of the mitochondrial ribosome at a level of resolution never achieved before. The ribosome can be thought of as a decryption device housed within the cell. It is able to decipher the genetic...

2013-12-16 12:09:02

Research will be presented on Sunday, Dec. 15, during ASCB annual meeting in New Orleans Resolving a fundamental question in cell biology and showing off the powers of new high-resolution 3-D imaging, NIH scientists have discovered where the Golgi apparatus, which sorts newly synthesized proteins for transport inside and outside the cell, goes when it disassembles during cell division, according to research to be presented on Sunday, Dec. 15, at the American Association for Cell Biology...

2013-09-30 14:10:50

The outer membrane of bacteria contains many proteins that form tiny pores. They are important for absorbing nutrients and transmitting signals into the cell. The research group of Sebastian Hiller, Professor of Structural Biology at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has now shown for the first time at atomic resolution, that these pore proteins are transported in an unstructured, constantly changing state to the outer bacterial membrane. This landmark study was recently published in the...

2013-09-23 10:25:49

Molecular microbiologists at the University of Southern California (USC) have uncovered intricate regulatory mechanisms within the cell that could lead to novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Their findings, which have long-standing significance in the basic understanding of cell biology, appear in the journal Nature Cell Biology. "Our research reveals a new regulatory mechanism that coordinates two distinct intracellular processes that are critical to...

2013-06-25 23:31:51

The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine EurekaMag.com provides 36 million references including 11 million summaries in the basic and applied biological, geographical and agricultural sciences. While this content base has now been expanded to include 180,868 newly published references on ultrastructural studies, all content is now available through a newly developed mobile site. Mannheim, Germany (PRWEB) June 25, 2013 The Science Website EurekaMag.com has newly published 181 thousand...

2012-08-07 23:33:26

Inflammation and cell stress play important roles in the death of insulin-secreting cells and are major factors in diabetes. Cell stress also plays a role in Wolfram syndrome, a rare, genetic disorder that afflicts children with many symptoms, including juvenile-onset diabetes. Now a molecule has been identified that's key to the cell stress-modulated inflammation that causes insulin cells to die, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University of...

2012-01-09 17:53:33

The discovery of a gene that causes a form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) may provide scientists with an important insight into what causes axons, the stems of our nerve cells, to degenerate in conditions such as multiple sclerosis. In the Journal of Clinical Investigation today, an international team of scientists led by Dr Evan Reid at the University of Cambridge, and Dr Stephan Zuchner from the University of Miami, report that mutations in the gene known as 'reticulon 2' on...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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