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Latest Endothelial progenitor cell Stories

How Blood Vessels Regroup After Stroke
2013-02-11 10:53:18

By thinking of cells as programmable robots, researchers at Rice University hope to someday direct how they grow into the tiny blood vessels that feed the brain and help people regain functions lost to stroke and disease.

New Blood-vessel-generating Cell With Therapeutic Potential Discovered
2012-10-17 10:39:06

Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, believe they have discovered stem cells that play a decisive role in new blood vessel growth.

Researchers Create Living Model Of Brain Tumor
2012-02-17 04:58:29

Brown University scientists have created the first three-dimensional living tissue model, complete with surrounding blood vessels, to analyze the effectiveness of therapeutics to combat brain tumors.

2012-02-15 23:11:18

A UCSF stem cell study conducted in mice suggests a novel strategy for treating damaged cardiac tissue in patients following a heart attack.

2012-01-09 06:29:41

Give it time, time heals all wounds, these words of wisdom are true when it comes to healing. As healing progresses, the need to grow new blood vessels is critical to providing nutrients and oxygen; however, it takes time to grow these necessary blood vessels.

2012-01-03 14:05:15

Wound healing requires complex interactions between cells resident at the damaged site and infiltrating immune cells.

2011-07-11 14:08:00

HONG KONG, July 11, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- OrbusNeich today announced that data from an ex vivo arteriovenous (AV) shunt model of human circulating blood, in addition to results from three preclinical studies, demonstrated that the Genous Stent effectively captures circulating CD34+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) leading to accelerated re-endothelialization and decreased thrombogenicity compared to bare metal stents (BMS).


Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.