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Latest Entomology Stories

Image 1 - Ancient Crickets Hint At The Origins Of Insect Hearing
2012-01-04 04:53:04

How did insects get their hearing? A new study of 50 million year-old cricket and katydid fossils – sporting some of the best preserved fossil insect ears described to date– help trace the evolution of the insect ear, says a new study by researchers working at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. Insects hear with help from unusual ears, said co-author Roy Plotnick of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Grasshoppers have ears on their abdomens. Lacewings have ears on...

Image 1 - Insects Could Help Find Disaster Survivors
2011-12-26 08:11:50

Insects outfitted with tiny cameras and microphones could be used to help find survivors of earthquakes and other disasters during search and rescue operations, scientists have said. The device will be powered by the insect themselves as they move. By converting kinetic energy into electricity, the devices could have a lasting power source. The device could also harness electricity from heat given off as well. The idea is that once these insects, particularly beetles, are fitted with...

Keep Arms And Legs Hairy To Keep Bed Bugs Away
2011-12-15 12:21:04

Looking to avoid confrontations with bed bugs? You will be better off not shaving your legs according to researchers in the UK. Twenty-nine volunteers bravely tested the theory by Michael Siva-Jothy, from Sheffield University´s Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, BBC News is reporting. Siva-Jothy found that more layers of both long and short body hair near the surface appeared to work as a deterrent to the blood-sucking insects, with the finer hairs acting as an early warning...

2011-12-01 13:42:44

A new study published in the Journal of Economic Entomology shows that radiation can be used to effectively sterilize the light brown apple moth (LBAM), an insect pest found in Australia, New Zealand, California, Hawaii, Sweden, and the British Isles. The light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), feeds on apples, pears, stonefruits, citrus, grapes, berries and many other plants. A native of Australia, it has been found in California since 2007. The California Department of Food...

Image 1 - Insect Cyborgs As First Responders
2011-11-24 04:12:03

Research conducted at the University of Michigan College of Engineering may lead to the use of insects to monitor hazardous situations before sending in humans. Professor Khalil Najafi, the chair of electrical and computer engineering, and doctoral student Erkan Aktakka are finding ways to harvest energy from insects, and take the utility of the miniature cyborgs to the next level. "Through energy scavenging, we could potentially power cameras, microphones and other sensors and...

Image 1 - Ancient Moths Reveal Wing Colors
2011-11-16 07:58:25

New research is allowing scientists to learn what the colors of fossilized moths would have been. Maria McNamara, a paleobiologist and postdoctoral researcher at Yale University was examining fossils from oil shale in Germany when she came across the remains of several moth species, all belonging to a group called lepidopterans, which also includes butterflies. “Until now, we had no idea what colors ancient moths and butterflies had,” McNamara relates to Stephanie Pappas of...

Image 1 - Diet Key To Becoming A Queen Bee
2011-11-10 13:30:47

A honey bee becomes a royal queen or a common worker as a result of the food she receives as a larva. While it has been well established that royal jelly is the diet that makes bees queens, the molecular path from food to queen is still in dispute. However, scientists at Arizona State University, led by Adam Dolezal and Gro Amdam, have helped reconcile some of the conflicts about bee development and the role of insulin pathways and partner proteins. Their article "IIS and TOR...

Dragonflies Are The Flying Aces Of The Insect World
2011-10-04 05:03:37

[ Watch the Video ] Research focuses on aerial feats such as hunting and mating in mid-air Next time you see a dragonfly, try to watch it catch its next meal on the go. Good luck! "Unless we film it in high speed, we can't see whether it caught the prey, but when it gets back to its perch, if we see it chewing, we know that it was successful," says Stacey Combes, a biomechanist at Harvard University. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), she and her team are...

2011-09-28 12:40:22

The creation of compounds that disrupt a worldwide pest´s winter sleep hints at the potential to develop natural and targeted controls against crop-eating insects, new research suggests. Scientists have designed agents that interfere with the protective dormancy period of the corn earworm, a species that infests more than 100 types of plants and costs American farmers an estimated $2 billion a year in losses and control costs. The compounds, composed of synthetic molecules that...


Latest Entomology Reference Libraries

Entomology
2013-10-01 10:34:23

Entomology, a branch of arthropodology, is the study of insects. In the past, the term insect was used to refer to species from other phyla or groups including arachnids, slugs, and earthworms. This view of entomology is still used in informal settings today. Entomology extends through cross sections of science including paleontology, biochemistry, and nutrition, among many others. There are 1.3 million species of insects throughout the world, so entomology covers a large base of research...

Myrmecology
2013-09-30 16:20:45

Myrmecology, a branch of entomology, is the study of ants that has focused on many factors about ants, including evolution and social systems. William Morton Wheeler first used the term myrmecology, but the study of ants predates the usage of the term, going back to ancient references of ants. Auguste Forel, a Swiss psychologist, conducted the first scientific studies of ants, focusing on the roles of instinct and learning in a society. He published Les fourmis de la Suisse in 1874 after...

Inchman, Myrmecia forficate
2013-07-10 12:28:46

The inchman (Myrmecia forficate) is a species of bull ant that can be found in Australia, in a range that includes Tasmania and possibly southeastern areas of Australia. This species is gregarious, living in colonies like most other ant species, but it forages for food alone. Nests often go unseen and are typically found under rocks.  It reaches an average body length of up to one inch long, the trait from which it received its common name. The inchman is both a scavenger and a...

Rhithrogena germanica
2013-07-09 15:10:58

Rhithrogena germanica, known as the March brown mayfly in in the British Isle, is a species of mayfly that can be found throughout northern and central areas of Europe. Its range includes the River Tweed in England, Hesse in Germany, Denmark, Poland, and France. It was first described by Alfred Edwin Eaton, who studied a male specimen from the River Rhine. Rhithrogena germanica begins its lifecycle in the larval stage, as a water dwelling naiad that is typically found in fast flowing,...

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2009-04-28 21:01:20

The Argema mittrei, more commonly known as the Comet or Moon Moth, is an endangered species. It is a native of Madagascar and that is the only place where one can observe them in the wild. This large silk moth can be bred in captivity and is one of the world's largest moths. Males have an average wing span of nearly 8 inches and a tail span of almost 6 inches. The lifespan of an adult moth is only 4-5 days and they are capable of reproduction from day 1. Their cocoons are uniquely...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'