Quantcast

Latest Entomology Stories

f2c9fcad111685fde5902e82c87ef918
2011-07-19 12:20:00

German scientists have discovered new ancient relatives of the modern mayfly from the Lower Cretaceous of South America. The experts discovered adult winged specimens and preserved larvae to clarify the phylogenetic position of the insects. The insects were equipped with wing venation of a mayfly, breast and wing shape of a dragonfly, and legs of a praying mantis.  However, the larvae look more like freshwater shrimps.  The scientists said some of their characters clearly suggest...

fef1eeca9eb90595b52034b5929c1144
2011-06-27 08:31:48

About 100 million years ago, a tiny mayfly had a problem. Like most adult mayflies, she only had that one day to live anyway, so there was no time to waste. She took her mating flight, got fertilized, and was about to lay her eggs when something went horribly wrong. She got stuck in some oozing tree sap and died, preserved for all time in the magic of amber. There would be ho hatchlings. It was a pretty rude ending to what was already going to be a short adulthood. But her personal tragedy...

0743e23f37b21a6b73d13bef60a199dd
2011-06-20 05:20:00

Fifty-billion dollars are spent annually around the globe on insect eradication and control. Now researchers are hoping to create targeted solutions to specific insects that do not include the killing of helpful species, reports BBC News. With the costs of genome sequencing falling substantially, it is now feasible to cheaply sequence large numbers of animals and plants. The 5000 Insect and Other Arthropod Genome Initiative will point researchers towards vulnerable regions of insects'...

0b3dbc524cd60dac035bea10b821960b
2011-06-14 09:57:28

Bees use their eyes to tell them how best to streamline their bodies for rapid flight, a world first study shows. Scientists at The Vision Centre have fooled the honeybee into revealing its flying secrets by tethering the creature and running background images past its eyes. This tricks the bee into thinking it is "Ëœflying' and it moves its body into a posture for rapid flight "“ even though both it and the air are still. The research indicates that vision is an important...

2011-06-07 00:00:32

Evergreen Research is proud to announce the launch of their new website for their line of all natural insect repelling products featuring the Superband the Bugbutton and the Mosquito Eliminator. San Marcos, California (PRWEB) June 06, 2011 Now at http://www.bugbutton.com users can easily navigate through the eye catching pages and learn more about each unique product and its uses. The new website allows users to have an opportunity to chat with Evergreen staff live and direct if they have...

b7a4c45777dbae1cbf79fe08a8514013
2011-05-06 06:00:00

The origin and evolution of treehopper 'helmets' has been traced by developmental biologists to show that they have achieved what no other insects have done in more than 300 million years; they have developed a third set of wings, which have been modified to form the helmet. Treehoppers are small, odd-shaped relatives of cicadas and are masters of disguise. They have outgrowths called helmets that could resemble anything from seeds to thorns to caterpillar poop and even ants. The extravagant...

2011-04-26 15:16:21

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists are playing a key role in efforts to contain the emerald ash borer's destructive march through the nation's forests. Researchers with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are testing a fungal pathogen that could be used as a biocontrol, along with the release of non-stinging wasps that are the beetle's natural enemies. Wasps have been released in Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia and Maryland, and releases are planned in...

2011-03-24 13:57:12

Using commercially available parts, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and colleagues have developed a new automated system for detecting insects based on the peculiar sounds the insects make while moving. According to entomologist Richard Mankin of USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS), one likely application will be to automate routine monitoring of industrial-scale traps, especially those placed in hard-to-reach areas like crawl spaces or near food processing equipment....

2011-03-23 13:34:18

A University of Alberta-led research team has discovered that insects that bore into trees as long ago 90 million years, or as recently as last summer, leave a calling card that's rich with information. The information is contained in the resin found within trees and on their bark. Resin is produced in large quantities by a tree when it's under attack by insects. Normally, to assess if a tree is under an attack from boring insects researchers have sometimes had to rip patches of bark from...

2011-03-10 15:14:17

In mathematics, you need at most only four different colors to produce a map in which no two adjacent regions have the same color. Utah and Arizona are considered adjacent, but Utah and New Mexico, which only share a point, are not. The four-color theorem proves this conjecture for generic maps of countries, but actually of more use in solving scheduling problems, scheduling, register allocation in computing and frequency assignment in mobile communications and broadcasting. Researchers in...


Latest Entomology Reference Libraries

Entomology
2013-10-01 10:34:23

Entomology, a branch of arthropodology, is the study of insects. In the past, the term insect was used to refer to species from other phyla or groups including arachnids, slugs, and earthworms. This view of entomology is still used in informal settings today. Entomology extends through cross sections of science including paleontology, biochemistry, and nutrition, among many others. There are 1.3 million species of insects throughout the world, so entomology covers a large base of research...

Myrmecology
2013-09-30 16:20:45

Myrmecology, a branch of entomology, is the study of ants that has focused on many factors about ants, including evolution and social systems. William Morton Wheeler first used the term myrmecology, but the study of ants predates the usage of the term, going back to ancient references of ants. Auguste Forel, a Swiss psychologist, conducted the first scientific studies of ants, focusing on the roles of instinct and learning in a society. He published Les fourmis de la Suisse in 1874 after...

Inchman, Myrmecia forficate
2013-07-10 12:28:46

The inchman (Myrmecia forficate) is a species of bull ant that can be found in Australia, in a range that includes Tasmania and possibly southeastern areas of Australia. This species is gregarious, living in colonies like most other ant species, but it forages for food alone. Nests often go unseen and are typically found under rocks.  It reaches an average body length of up to one inch long, the trait from which it received its common name. The inchman is both a scavenger and a...

Rhithrogena germanica
2013-07-09 15:10:58

Rhithrogena germanica, known as the March brown mayfly in in the British Isle, is a species of mayfly that can be found throughout northern and central areas of Europe. Its range includes the River Tweed in England, Hesse in Germany, Denmark, Poland, and France. It was first described by Alfred Edwin Eaton, who studied a male specimen from the River Rhine. Rhithrogena germanica begins its lifecycle in the larval stage, as a water dwelling naiad that is typically found in fast flowing,...

0_83a64d28dd91b9c3ed9af9775856fed3
2009-04-28 21:01:20

The Argema mittrei, more commonly known as the Comet or Moon Moth, is an endangered species. It is a native of Madagascar and that is the only place where one can observe them in the wild. This large silk moth can be bred in captivity and is one of the world's largest moths. Males have an average wing span of nearly 8 inches and a tail span of almost 6 inches. The lifespan of an adult moth is only 4-5 days and they are capable of reproduction from day 1. Their cocoons are uniquely...

More Articles (17 articles) »
Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
Related