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Latest Entomology Stories

2009-12-03 22:19:47

Discovery offers opportunity to develop new environmentally safe ways to control pests A team of University of Minnesota researchers have discovered how PTTH, a hormone produced by the brain, controls the metamorphosis of juvenile insects into adults. The finding, published in the Dec. 4 issue of Science, will help scientists understand how insect body size is programmed in response to developmental and environmental cues and offers the opportunity to develop a new generation of more...

2009-11-30 11:27:28

For the first time, scientists at The University of Western Ontario have shown that insects exposed to repeated periods of cold will trade reproduction for immediate survival. The study, conducted by Biology PhD candidate Katie Marshall and supervisor Brent Sinclair, has been published online Nov. 25 by the prestigious journal, Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Results showed flies exposed to multiple bouts of cold survived better, but produced fewer offspring.  Past research had...

2009-11-23 09:40:03

Since 1996, crop plants genetically modified to produce bacterial proteins that are toxic to certain insects, yet safe for people, have been planted on more than 200 million hectares worldwide. The popularity of these Bt crops, named after the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, comes from their ability to kill some major pests, allowing farmers to save money and lessen environmental impacts by reducing insecticide sprays. However, since insects can evolve resistance to toxins, strategies must...

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2009-11-18 05:55:00

CFD visualization used at Wright State University to study the complex flow physics of dragonfly flight Most students caught hanging out in the school parking lot during class might find themselves in a bit of trouble, but for Dr. Haibo Dong's grad students, it's a study requirement.   "They've been out there all morning trying to catch a few dragonflies," he laughs. "We have a high-speed camera in the lab, but don't have any subjects to film. Catching them can be hard because...

2009-10-27 14:57:59

Growing concerns about health has caused the scientific community to focus their interest on investigating functional foods which contribute to boosting the prevention and reduction of the risk of suffering from certain illnesses. The benefits of this product lies in its composition and, thus, its study, identification and subsequent extraction provides a useful tool which enables making high added-value products, given their high concentration of biologically active compounds. Over the past...

2009-09-24 09:15:29

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)-funded research, published this week in Chemical Communication, describes how scientists have discovered molecules that could confuse insects' ability to detect plants by interfering with their sense of smell. This could reduce damage to crops by insect pests and contribute to food security. Lead researcher Dr Antony Hooper of Rothamsted Research, an institute of BBSRC said: "One way in which insects find each other and their...

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2009-09-18 07:10:00

Modeling the aerodynamic secrets of one of Nature's most efficient flyers Researchers are one step closer to creating a micro-aircraft that flies with the maneuverability and energy efficiency of an insect after decoding the aerodynamic secrets of insect flight. Dr John Young, from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia, and a team of animal flight researchers from Oxford University's Department of Zoology, used high-speed digital video cameras to film locusts in action in a...

2009-09-16 06:11:33

San Antonio is trying to deal with a tiny invader that can cause big problems, the crazy ant. A few colonies of crazy ants have been found in one section of the city, the San Antonio Express News reports. They probably arrived from Houston, where they have been established for about 10 years, possibly brought in on plants. Unlike fire ants, crazy ants do not bite or sting, experts say. What they do is multiply to the point where their colonies have millions or billions of ants. They...

2009-09-10 08:35:00

Bee colonies are well known for high levels of cooperation, but new research published in Molecular Ecology demonstrates a conflict for reproduction between worker bees and their queens, leading some workers to selfishly exploit the colony for their own needs. The study focused on Melipona scutellaris a Brazilian species of highly social stingless bees, found throughout the Atlantic rainforest. Colonies contain around 1,500 workers and are headed by one single-mated Queen. Denise Alves, Dr...

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2009-08-31 11:50:00

Travelers to the neotropics"”the tropical lands of the Americas"”might be forgiven for thinking that all of the colorful insects flittering over sunny puddles or among dense forest understory are butterflies. In fact, many are not. Some are moths that have reinvented themselves as butterflies, converging on the daytime niche typically dominated by their less hairy relatives. Now, a new revision of the taxonomic relationships among one such group of insects, the subfamily...


Latest Entomology Reference Libraries

Entomology
2013-10-01 10:34:23

Entomology, a branch of arthropodology, is the study of insects. In the past, the term insect was used to refer to species from other phyla or groups including arachnids, slugs, and earthworms. This view of entomology is still used in informal settings today. Entomology extends through cross sections of science including paleontology, biochemistry, and nutrition, among many others. There are 1.3 million species of insects throughout the world, so entomology covers a large base of research...

Myrmecology
2013-09-30 16:20:45

Myrmecology, a branch of entomology, is the study of ants that has focused on many factors about ants, including evolution and social systems. William Morton Wheeler first used the term myrmecology, but the study of ants predates the usage of the term, going back to ancient references of ants. Auguste Forel, a Swiss psychologist, conducted the first scientific studies of ants, focusing on the roles of instinct and learning in a society. He published Les fourmis de la Suisse in 1874 after...

Inchman, Myrmecia forficate
2013-07-10 12:28:46

The inchman (Myrmecia forficate) is a species of bull ant that can be found in Australia, in a range that includes Tasmania and possibly southeastern areas of Australia. This species is gregarious, living in colonies like most other ant species, but it forages for food alone. Nests often go unseen and are typically found under rocks.  It reaches an average body length of up to one inch long, the trait from which it received its common name. The inchman is both a scavenger and a...

Rhithrogena germanica
2013-07-09 15:10:58

Rhithrogena germanica, known as the March brown mayfly in in the British Isle, is a species of mayfly that can be found throughout northern and central areas of Europe. Its range includes the River Tweed in England, Hesse in Germany, Denmark, Poland, and France. It was first described by Alfred Edwin Eaton, who studied a male specimen from the River Rhine. Rhithrogena germanica begins its lifecycle in the larval stage, as a water dwelling naiad that is typically found in fast flowing,...

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2009-04-28 21:01:20

The Argema mittrei, more commonly known as the Comet or Moon Moth, is an endangered species. It is a native of Madagascar and that is the only place where one can observe them in the wild. This large silk moth can be bred in captivity and is one of the world's largest moths. Males have an average wing span of nearly 8 inches and a tail span of almost 6 inches. The lifespan of an adult moth is only 4-5 days and they are capable of reproduction from day 1. Their cocoons are uniquely...

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Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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