Quantcast

Latest Environmental microbiology Stories

2014-02-07 13:15:15

A team of researchers led by Virginia Tech and University of California, Berkeley, scientists has discovered that a regulatory process that turns on photosynthesis in plants at daybreak likely developed on Earth in ancient microbes 2.5 billion years ago, long before oxygen became available. The research opens new scientific areas in the fields of evolutionary biology and microbiology. The work also has broad societal implications as it allows scientists to better understand the production...

2014-01-10 11:12:16

The human microbiome, the collection of trillions of microbes living in and on the human body, is not random, and scientists believe that it plays a role in many basic life processes. As science continues to explore and better understand the role of the human microbiome. A new report from the American Academy of Microbiology addresses some of the most common questions about this growing area of research. The report, entitled FAQ: Human Microbiome is based on the deliberations of 13 of the...

2014-01-10 10:45:38

Scientists discover extracellular vesicles produced by ocean microbes Marine cyanobacteria — tiny ocean plants that produce oxygen and make organic carbon using sunlight and CO2 — are primary engines of Earth's biogeochemical and nutrient cycles. They nourish other organisms through the provision of oxygen and with their own body mass, which forms the base of the ocean food chain. Now scientists at MIT have discovered another dimension of the outsized role played by these tiny...

2014-01-08 17:19:59

UT Arlington researchers focusing on the Amazon recently found that widespread conversion from rainforest to pastureland has significant effects on microorganism communities that may lead to a reduction in the region’s role as a reservoir for greenhouse gas. The Amazon rainforest is the largest terrestrial reservoir or “sink” for carbon dioxide, a gas that has been linked to climate change. Through photosynthesis, the Amazon absorbs 1.5 billion tons of carbon dioxide from the...

Sandstone Bacteria thrives on oil iron
2013-12-19 08:32:10

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Able to withstand high heat, high salinity, low oxygen, utter darkness and pressures that would kill most other organisms, the bacteria Halomonas is a very hardy breed. Traits such as these enable these microbes to eke out a living in deep sandstone and have proven to be useful for hydrocarbon extraction and carbon sequestration. The new study, published in Environmental Microbiology, gives the first unobstructed view of the...

Domestic Dogs Offer Protection From Asthma And Infection: Study
2013-12-17 11:46:04

[ Watch the Video: Pet Dogs May Shield Kids From Later Allergies ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Previous research has shown that children who grow up in a house with a dog are less likely to develop severe allergies and now a new study from an American team of researchers has found that gut bacteria may play a role in that relationship. According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), mice that were exposed to...

2013-11-05 11:45:51

Transferring the gut microbes from a mouse with colon tumors to germ-free mice makes those mice prone to getting tumors as well, according to the results of a study published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The work has implications for human health because it indicates the risk of colorectal cancer may well have a microbial component. "We know that humans have a number of different community structures in the gut. When you think about...

2013-10-30 10:51:43

Most of us wouldn't consider bacteria a promising energy source of the future. That would be shortsighted, says Leonard Tender, a microbial-electrochemist at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., who believes that the focus of his research – electrode reactions catalyzed by microorganisms – may one day provide cheap, clean and abundant energy by converting the carbon dioxide in seawater to fuel and the organic matter in wastewater into electrical power. Tender will discuss...

Methane Seeps Of The Deep Sea Are A Bacteria Feast For Lithodid Crabs
2013-10-08 09:54:33

Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR) Photos and analyses reveal more about a highly specialized food web The bottom of the deep sea is largely deserted. Oases occur for example at cold seeps where water transports dissolved elements from the seabed: Specialized microbes convert methane and sulfate from sea water to hydrogen sulfide releasing carbon dioxide. Highly adapted bacteria, many of which live in symbiosis with worms and clams, use the hydrogen sulfide for their...


Word of the Day
blee
  • Color; hue; complexion.
This word is Middle English in origin.
Related