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Latest Environmental microbiology Stories

2011-12-21 13:03:00

Ultimate goal: Tailings water treatment plants for all oil sands operations Alberta's oilsands have water challenges. Oilsands development uses a vast amount of water and even though it's recycled multiple times, the recycling concentrates the toxins and metals leftover from extracting and upgrading the bitumen, resulting in tailings ponds that are both a lightning rod for controversy and a significant risk to the environment. A research project underway between biologists at the...

2011-11-29 08:26:47

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — You may want to refrain from touching anything in a public restroom after you wash your hands. Researchers used novel genetic sequencing methods to reveal a plethora of bacteria all over public restrooms. This leads to potential public health implications, according to this study. Led by Gilberto Flores and Noah Fierer of the University of Colorado, Boulder, the researchers investigated 12 public restrooms, 6 male and 6 female, in Colorado. Using a...

2011-11-18 03:57:16

Interfering with the ability of biofilm-forming bacteria to sense starvation increases their susceptibility to antibiotics Many infections, even those caused by antibiotic-sensitive bacteria, resist treatment. This paradox has vexed physicians for decades, and makes some infections impossible to cure. A key cause of this resistance is that bacteria become starved for nutrients during infection. Starved bacteria resist killing by nearly every type of antibiotic, even ones they have never...

Why Do Some Patients Get Infections From Cardiac Implants?
2011-10-25 03:35:37

New research suggests that some patients develop a potentially deadly blood infection from their implanted cardiac devices because bacterial cells in their bodies have gene mutations that allow them to stick to the devices. Patients with implants can develop infections because of a biofilm of persistent bacterial bugs on the surfaces of their devices. Researchers found that some strains of the bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, have just a few genetic variants in the proteins on their...

2011-10-24 22:51:44

Infectious films of Staph bacteria around an implanted cardiac device, such as a pacemaker, often force a second surgery to replace the device at a cost of up to $100,000. But not all implanted cardiac devices become infected. Now researchers from Duke University Medical Center and Ohio State University (OSU) have discovered how and why certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacteria, the leading cause of these device infections, have infected thousands of implanted cardiac devices....

2011-10-11 09:15:53

World class scientist Professor Willem M. de Vos will explain next Monday how the microbes that are closest to our hearts — gut microbes — could underpin a new way of thinking about human biology. As well as looking at our own genes, we can now include those of our microbes in studies of human health and disease. This is a significant shift in the way we approach human biology. Gut microbes affect our health by producing vitamins, priming our immune system and contributing to...

2011-10-10 07:00:00

Agile Sciences will collaborate with Dr. Richard Boucher, Director of the Cystic Fibrosis Center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Raleigh, NC (PRWEB) October 10, 2011 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded Agile Sciences a Phase I STTR Grant to evaluate the efficacy of Agile Sciencesâ proprietary Agilyteâ“ž¢ anti-biofilm molecules for treating lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. The molecules will be tested in...

2011-10-05 17:57:33

Max Planck scientists unravel key pathway in the nitrogen cycle The anaerobic oxidation of ammonia (anammox) is an important pathway in the nitrogen cycle that was only discovered in the 1980s. Currently, scientists estimate that about 50 percent of the nitrogen in the atmosphere is forged by this process. A group of specialized bacteria perform the anammox reaction, but so far scientists have been in the dark about how these bacteria could convert ammonia to nitrogen in the complete...

Cat Urine To Power Space Travel?
2011-10-04 08:36:19

Will our next generation of space travel be powered by cat urine? Researchers from Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands released a study which details the work of a particular bacterium that turns the smelly contents of your cat box (or any other type of urine) into space fuel, AFP is reporting. The results of the scientists´ work show that the bacterium anammox, first identified in the 1990´s, thrives in the absence of oxygen and transforms ammonium, the...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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