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Latest Eocene Stories

Killing Name Of An Extinct Sirenian Species
2014-04-03 12:34:02

Pensoft Publishers Sirenians, or sea cows, are a particular group of mammals that superficially resembles whales in having, amongst other features, a streamlined-body and horizontal tail fluke. Though belonging to the so-called marine mammals, such as whales and seals, sea cows are members of a group having a single origin that includes their closest living relatives, the proboscideans (or elephants in the broader sense). Today, sirenians are known by only four species, but their...

reconstruction of Dormaalcyon latouri
2014-01-07 04:06:08

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Over 250 teeth and ankle bone fossils discovered in Belgium have allowed researchers to gain new insight into some of the best-known and most-loved mammals on Earth, according to a new study appearing in the latest edition of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. According to the study authors, the group of mammals known as carnivoraforms (which includes creatures such as cats, dogs, bears and seals) can trace its roots back to...

Dwarfism In Mammals Also Occurred During Second Warming Period
2013-11-03 05:03:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While scientists have known for several years that some mammals became smaller during a period of warming known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), researchers from the University of Michigan have found a second instance of mammalian “dwarfing” attributable to increasing temperatures. During the PETM, which occurred approximately 55 million years ago, mammals such as primates and groups that include deer and horses...

Oceans May Change Drastically In The Future
2013-08-06 05:37:31

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study, led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, reveals the look of the oceans will change drastically in the future as the coming greenhouse world alters marine food webs and gives certain species advantages over others, if history's closest analog is any indication. Richard Norris, paleobiologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, worked with an international team of scientists to show the ancient...

2013-07-12 12:48:32

Simon Fraser University biologists have discovered a new, extinct family of insects that will help scientists better understand how some animals responded to global climate change and the evolution of communities. The Eocene Apex of Panorpoid Family Diversity, a paper by SFU’s Bruce Archibald and Rolf Mathewes, plus David Greenwood from Brandon University, was recently published in the Journal of Paleontology. The researchers named the new family the Eorpidae, after...

Antarctic Was Tropical During The Eocene Epoch
2012-08-02 10:22:02

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As the world´s greatest athletes compete for gold, silver, and bronze in London, new scientific evidence suggests that future summer Olympics could be hosted in a more remote location: Antarctica. An international team of climate scientists has discovered 50 million-year-old fossilized pollen in the seabed off the eastern coast of the polar continent, according to their report published this week in the journal Nature. The...

Ancient Turtles Make Love, Embraced Death
2012-06-21 05:21:32

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com German paleontologists wrote in the Royal Society Journal Biology Letters that they have uncovered the remains of nine turtle pairs that died while having sex 47 million years ago. The scientists wrote in the report that they had determined the ancient turtles died while mating in poisonous waters. "Millions of animals live and die every year and many enter the fossil record through serendipitous circumstances, but there really is no reason to enter the...

Mammal Diversity Aided In Survival Over Deep Time
2012-04-24 12:24:49

Lawrence LeBlond for RedOrbit.com In a first of its kind study, researchers from Vanderbilt University found that mammals´ best defense to adapting to climate change was diversity, and families with higher taxonomic diversity were better able to survive ongoing environmental changes. Larisa R. G. DeSantis, Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Vanderbilt, led researchers in studying how North American mammals adapted to climate change over a 56-million-year...

2012-04-02 21:04:05

A series of global warming events called hyperthermals that occurred more than 50 million years ago had a similar origin to a much larger hyperthermal of the period, the Pelaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), new research has found. The findings represent a breakthrough in understanding the major “burp” of carbon, equivalent to burning the entire reservoir of fossil fuels on Earth, that occurred during the PETM. “As geologists, it unnerves us that we don´t know...

Climate Change Drove Shrinkage In Ancient Horse
2012-02-24 05:39:51

The ancient sifrhippus, the earliest known horse, lived around 50 million years ago. It was very distinct in its appearance because it was only about the size of a modern day house cat, weighing in around 12 pounds. The horse lived in what is known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a 175,000 year period where the Earth's atmospheric temperature rose by about 10 degrees Fahrenheit, caused by a great release of carbon into the atmosphere and oceans. In response to the...