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Latest Eocene Stories

Better Understanding Arctic Climate Change Based On Shark Teeth
2014-07-10 08:44:06

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Today, polar bears and other animals adapted to extremely cold environments inhabit the Arctic tundra. In the past, around 53 to 38 million years ago (the Eocene epoch), the Arctic was not a frozen tundra -- rather, it was more like a huge temperate forest with brackish water. This forest was home to a wide variety of wildlife, including the ancestors of modern-day tapirs, hippo-like creatures, crocodiles and giant tortoises....

reconstruction of the early Eocene
2014-07-09 09:33:31

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Silvacola acares is a tiny hedgehog species that lived roughly 52-million-years ago, during the Eocene Epoch. Its fossil remains were recently identified by a University of Colorado Boulder-led team working in British Columbia. Along with the tiny hedgehog, the fossils of a tapir-like animal were also discovered. A paper on the discovery of these two ancient mammals is being published today in the Journal of Vertebrate...

modern day sand tiger shark
2014-07-01 05:12:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most sharks today are strictly saltwater fish, however, a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Chicago reveals that this was not the case 50 million years ago. Sharks in the Arctic Ocean during this time lived in brackish water, with approximately the same amount of freshwater found in modern day Lake Ponchatrain in Louisiana. The study, led by University of Chicago postdoctoral researcher Sora...

2014-06-25 23:03:37

Dr. Robert Anemone, head of the Department of Anthropology at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, breaks new ground as he teams up with a geographer and employs satellites, computers and drones to pinpoint Eocene-era fossils in Wyoming's Great Divide Basin. Greensboro, NC (PRWEB) June 25, 2014 Paleontologist Robert Anemone’s wrong turn turned out to be a happy accident that led him to a rich cache of 50 million-year-old fossil mammals. That was back in 2009 as he and his...

Antarctica Was A Balmy 72 Degrees Fahrenheit During The Eocene
2014-04-22 13:07:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Previous studies have shown that Antarctica was a much warmer continent 40 to 50 million years ago and a new report from a team of American, Dutch and Australian researchers has revealed finer details on the milder temperature that blanketed the region at the time. Published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the new report revealed that parts of Antarctica were as warm as Coastal California and sea...

Killing Name Of An Extinct Sirenian Species
2014-04-03 12:34:02

Pensoft Publishers Sirenians, or sea cows, are a particular group of mammals that superficially resembles whales in having, amongst other features, a streamlined-body and horizontal tail fluke. Though belonging to the so-called marine mammals, such as whales and seals, sea cows are members of a group having a single origin that includes their closest living relatives, the proboscideans (or elephants in the broader sense). Today, sirenians are known by only four species, but their...

reconstruction of Dormaalcyon latouri
2014-01-07 04:06:08

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Over 250 teeth and ankle bone fossils discovered in Belgium have allowed researchers to gain new insight into some of the best-known and most-loved mammals on Earth, according to a new study appearing in the latest edition of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. According to the study authors, the group of mammals known as carnivoraforms (which includes creatures such as cats, dogs, bears and seals) can trace its roots back to...

Dwarfism In Mammals Also Occurred During Second Warming Period
2013-11-03 05:03:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While scientists have known for several years that some mammals became smaller during a period of warming known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), researchers from the University of Michigan have found a second instance of mammalian “dwarfing” attributable to increasing temperatures. During the PETM, which occurred approximately 55 million years ago, mammals such as primates and groups that include deer and horses...

Oceans May Change Drastically In The Future
2013-08-06 05:37:31

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study, led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, reveals the look of the oceans will change drastically in the future as the coming greenhouse world alters marine food webs and gives certain species advantages over others, if history's closest analog is any indication. Richard Norris, paleobiologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, worked with an international team of scientists to show the ancient...

2013-07-12 12:48:32

Simon Fraser University biologists have discovered a new, extinct family of insects that will help scientists better understand how some animals responded to global climate change and the evolution of communities. The Eocene Apex of Panorpoid Family Diversity, a paper by SFU’s Bruce Archibald and Rolf Mathewes, plus David Greenwood from Brandon University, was recently published in the Journal of Paleontology. The researchers named the new family the Eorpidae, after...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.