Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 14:04 EDT

Latest Eocene Stories

2e5ae7520c614d26f68fd75704f45ba71
2008-10-24 09:53:10

Fossil and other new forms date to ancient period of global warming An international team of scientists has discovered microscopic, magnetic fossils resembling spears and spindles, unlike anything previously seen, among sediment layers deposited during an ancient global-warming event along the Atlantic coastal plain of the United States. The researchers, led by geobiologists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and McGill University, describe the findings in a paper published...

882b3591a557468ed4fa86f4d44ae74b1
2008-10-14 10:50:00

Climate provided refuge for diminishing population More than 40 million years ago, primates preferred Texas to northern climates that were significantly cooling, according to new fossil evidence discovered by Chris Kirk, physical anthropologist at The University of Texas at Austin. Kirk and Blythe Williams from Duke University have discovered Diablomomys dalquesti, a new genus and species of primate that dates to 44-43 million years ago when tropical forests and active volcanoes covered west...

2008-03-03 18:41:52

Leaping, furry mini-monkeys that were as small as mice crossed the Bering land bridge long before humans, representing North America's oldest known primates. This new claim is based on the fossils of at least three individuals of this previously unknown species of extinct primate uncovered at a site near Meridian, Miss., scientists announced today. The researcher estimates the primate fossils date to about 55.8 million years ago. If the age of the fossils is accurate, the new...

d3186362a6770b4cdd6345f482e964201
2008-02-22 16:30:00

The oldest fossils to date of early rabbit relatives were recently unearthed. These specimens, which are 53 million years old, are tiny ankle bones which are clearly adapted to running. These fossils belong to lagomorphs, a group which currently includes rabbits, hares and pikas. Prior to this finding which is published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the oldest known lagomorphs dated to around 48 million years ago. The ankle bones which were found in...

bcaf05d6e03389cb0ba845c25f3aab751
2008-02-11 17:20:00

With implications for present climate, new data links past spike in temperature with increased voraciousness of plant-eating insectsMore than 55 million years ago, the Earth experienced a rapid jump in global carbon dioxide levels that raised temperatures across the planet. Now, researchers studying plants from that time have found that the rising temperatures may have boosted the foraging of insects. As modern temperatures continue to rise, the researchers believe the planet could see...

2005-11-11 07:32:06

WASHINGTON (AP) - An increase in the planet's temperature 55 million years ago prompted major shifts in plant distribution, researchers reported Thursday. A study of plant fossils from the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming shows the arrival of plants from warm southern areas, displacing those that had been growing there previously, according to a research team led by Scott L. Wing, chairman of the Department of Paleobiology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Their findings are...