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Latest Eocene Stories

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2009-07-14 05:00:00

A huge amount of global warming transformed the Earth into a hothouse 55 million years ago, but the cause remains a mystery, scientists stated on Monday. Prior research into the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, or PETM, notes that the planet's surface temperature increased by between 9 and 16.2 degrees Fahrenheit in just several thousand years. The Arctic Ocean's median temperature rose to 73 degrees, or the temperature of a lukewarm bath. PETM's heat wave is enigmatic, but climatologists...

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2009-06-01 13:39:42

Ancestors of tapirs and ancient cousins of rhinos living above the Arctic Circle 53 million years ago endured six months of darkness each year in a far milder climate than today that featured lush, swampy forests, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. CU-Boulder Assistant Professor Jaelyn Eberle said the study shows several varieties of prehistoric mammals as heavy as 1,000 pounds each lived on what is today Ellesmere Island near Greenland on a summer diet of...

378592cd24137a5c7b3c3d0a8d2ab3621
2009-01-08 16:50:00

The evolutionary history of diatoms -- abundant oceanic plankton that remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from the air each year -- needs to be rewritten, according to a new Cornell study. The findings suggest that after a sudden rise in species numbers, diatoms abruptly declined about 33 million years ago -- trends that coincided with severe global cooling.The study is published in the Jan. 8 issue of the journal Nature.The research casts doubt on the long-held theory that diatoms'...

2008-12-02 13:28:58

A U.S. geologist is warning the Earth might soon undergo rapid and unpredictable climate changes that could negatively affect many species. Binghamton University Professor Tim Lowenstein's concerns are rooted in his and Professor Robert Demicco's discovery of nahcolite -- a rare carbonate mineral that formed during the Eocene Epoch, the warmest period on Earth during the last 65 million years. Lowenstein and Demicco said nahcolite suggests Eocene warming was concurrent with atmospheric carbon...

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2008-12-02 10:19:44

By discovering the meaning of a rare mineral that can be used to track ancient climates, Binghamton University geologist Tim Lowenstein is helping climatologists and others better understand what we're probably in for over the next century or two as global warming begins to crank up the heat "” and, ultimately, to change life as we know it. "I think the earth will be a very different place in the next hundred years or so, and that many species will adapt to it and many won't,"...

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2008-10-24 09:53:10

Fossil and other new forms date to ancient period of global warming An international team of scientists has discovered microscopic, magnetic fossils resembling spears and spindles, unlike anything previously seen, among sediment layers deposited during an ancient global-warming event along the Atlantic coastal plain of the United States. The researchers, led by geobiologists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and McGill University, describe the findings in a paper published...

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2008-10-14 10:50:00

Climate provided refuge for diminishing population More than 40 million years ago, primates preferred Texas to northern climates that were significantly cooling, according to new fossil evidence discovered by Chris Kirk, physical anthropologist at The University of Texas at Austin. Kirk and Blythe Williams from Duke University have discovered Diablomomys dalquesti, a new genus and species of primate that dates to 44-43 million years ago when tropical forests and active volcanoes covered west...

2008-03-03 18:41:52

Leaping, furry mini-monkeys that were as small as mice crossed the Bering land bridge long before humans, representing North America's oldest known primates. This new claim is based on the fossils of at least three individuals of this previously unknown species of extinct primate uncovered at a site near Meridian, Miss., scientists announced today. The researcher estimates the primate fossils date to about 55.8 million years ago. If the age of the fossils is accurate, the new...

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2008-02-22 16:30:00

The oldest fossils to date of early rabbit relatives were recently unearthed. These specimens, which are 53 million years old, are tiny ankle bones which are clearly adapted to running. These fossils belong to lagomorphs, a group which currently includes rabbits, hares and pikas. Prior to this finding which is published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the oldest known lagomorphs dated to around 48 million years ago. The ankle bones which were found in...

bcaf05d6e03389cb0ba845c25f3aab751
2008-02-11 17:20:00

With implications for present climate, new data links past spike in temperature with increased voraciousness of plant-eating insectsMore than 55 million years ago, the Earth experienced a rapid jump in global carbon dioxide levels that raised temperatures across the planet. Now, researchers studying plants from that time have found that the rising temperatures may have boosted the foraging of insects. As modern temperatures continue to rise, the researchers believe the planet could see...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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