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Latest Eph receptor Stories

DNA Origami Nano-tool Used To Provide Important Clue To Cancer
2014-07-08 03:57:36

Karolinska Institutet Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have headed a study that has provided new knowledge about the EphA2 receptor, which is significant in several forms of cancer. This is important knowledge in itself – but just as important is how this study, which is published in the highly respected journal Nature Methods today, was conducted. The researchers used the method of DNA origami, in which a DNA molecule is shaped into a nanostructure, and used these...

2013-07-31 23:01:33

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation commends the researchers of the study published last week in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, which concludes that the ephrin B2 receptor plays an important role in malignant mesothelioma, and that it could serve as a potential novel target for the treatment of this disease. Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) July 31, 2013 Last week, the Journal of Thoracic Oncology published the results of a study looking into the overexpression of the ephrin B2 receptor...

2012-07-31 10:50:00

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have identified how one of the genes most commonly mutated in lung cancer may promote such tumors. The investigators found that the protein encoded by this gene, called EPHA3, normally inhibits tumor formation, and that loss or mutation of the gene — as often happens in lung cancer — diminishes this tumor-suppressive effect, potentially sparking the formation of lung cancer. The findings, published July 24 in the Journal of the...

2011-10-27 15:44:36

New discoveries about follicular lymphoma, a currently intractable form of cancer, highlight the power of functional genomics in cancer gene discovery. A report in the Oct 28th issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication, demonstrates how genetic insights can be translated directly into therapies. The findings are but one example of what has now become possible given the avalanche of data on cancer genomes. "With access to tumor genomic data, suddenly we can do this; we know what has...

2011-08-01 12:49:20

How do cells know where to position themselves and where to accumulate in order to carry out their functions correctly within each organ? Researchers with the Colorectal Cancer Lab at IRB Barcelona have revealed the molecular mechanisms responsible for organizing the intestinal epithelium into distinct comportments, defined by frontiers or territories. The study, headed by Eduard Batlle, coordinator of the Oncology Programme at IRB Barcelona and ICREA Research Professor, is published in...

2011-07-20 17:01:08

Dr. Ed Ruthazer is a mapmaker but, his landscape is the developing brain - specifically the neuronal circuitry, which is the network of connections between nerve cells. His research at The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital "“ The Neuro at McGill University, reveals the brain as a dynamic landscape where connections between nerves are plastic, changing and adapting to the demands of the environment. Dr. Ruthazer is the winner of the inaugural Young Investigator Award from the...

2010-09-17 09:54:45

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Cleft palate affects one of every 1,000 newborns.  That means that 489 children born each day experience this.  A recent study explains why a certain gene mutation causes craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), which is the reason for cleft palate and other malformations in the face, brain, and skeleton. A mutation in a gene called ephrin-B1 causes abnormalities in the facial development. Although previous research has already concluded this, scientists were still...

2010-09-15 16:40:00

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found a new mechanism that explains why a certain gene mutation causes craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), a disorder that causes cleft palate and other malformations in the face, brain, and skeleton. Cleft palate affects one of every 1,000 newborns. The research is published in the September 15 issue of Genes & Development. Previous research has shown that a mutation in a gene called ephrin-B1 caused abnormalities in facial development,...

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2010-03-12 11:14:35

Conventional biological wisdom holds that living cells  interact with their environment through an elaborate network of chemical signals. As a result many therapies for the treatment of cancer and other diseases in which cell behavior goes awry focus on drugs that block or disrupt harmful chemical signals. Now, a new road for future therapies may have been opened with scientific evidence for a never seen before way in which cells can also sense and respond to physical forces. A team of...

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2009-11-11 06:55:41

Researchers at Queen's University have found a link between two genes involved in cancer formation in humans, by examining the genes in worms. The groundbreaking discovery provides a foundation for how tumor-forming genes interact, and may offer a drug target for cancer treatment. "When cancer hijacks a healthy system, it can create tumors by causing cells to divide when they shouldn't," says Ian Chin-Sang, a developmental biologist at Queen's and lead researcher on the study. "Certain genes...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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