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Latest epidemics Stories

2007-01-08 09:27:58

MEXICO CITY -- Mexicans have long been taught to blame diseases brought by the Spaniards for wiping out most of their Indian ancestors. But recent research suggests things may not be that simple. While the initial big die-offs are still blamed on the Conquistadors who started arriving in 1519, even more virulent epidemics in 1545 and 1576 may have been caused by a native blood-hemorrhaging fever spread by rats, Mexican researchers say. The idea has sparked heated debate in Mexican academic...

2006-06-14 08:11:43

GENEVA (Reuters) - One hundred people are reported dead in a suspected outbreak of pneumonic plague in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday. It said 19 of the deaths were around the northeast Ituri district, which is know to be the most active area of human plague in the world with some 1,000 cases each year. Some cases of bubonic plague had also been reported, the United Nations' health agency added. But it said there...

2006-04-27 09:12:25

SPIN BOLDAK, Afghanistan (Reuters) - Afghanistan has found five cases of polio this year compared with one this time last year largely because people in some conservative areas are suspicious of immunization. Afghanistan is one of only four countries where the disease, which can paralyze a child within hours, is still endemic. The five new cases were all found in the southern province of Kandahar, three in the town of Spin Boldak on the Pakistani border. Health Ministry official...

2006-03-24 08:47:01

GENEVA (Reuters) - Nearly 200 children in Somalia have been paralyzed with polio since the disease re-emerged in July, and the virus is spreading in the lawless country, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. A nationwide vaccination campaign is being launched on Sunday to try to reach 1.4 million Somali children under age five, the United Nations agency added. "The polio outbreak in Somalia, which occurred in July 2005 with an importation of polio virus, has affected a...

2006-03-16 08:30:00

GENEVA (Reuters) - Bangladesh has reported its first case of polio in nearly six years, dealing a fresh blow to a global campaign to eradicate the crippling disease, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday. A nine-year-old girl in the southern Chittagong province was paralyzed in January. Genetic sequencing has confirmed it was the polio virus and that it was closely related to viruses detected in India, the WHO said in a statement. She was the first case reported since August...

2006-01-31 13:32:26

By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Tuesday it is about to announce that Egypt is polio-free, for the first time in 5,000 years, bringing global eradication a step closer. The last sample of the crippling virus in Egypt was found in sewage in mid-January 2005, but the U.N. agency said it is waiting for the final data for this month before making an expected announcement on Wednesday. A full year must pass without any new detection of...

2006-01-23 13:40:02

LONDON (Reuters) - Modern DNA analysis of ancient dental pulp suggests that typhoid fever was the cause of the plague which helped end the Golden Age in Athens, scientists said on Monday. The DNA collected from teeth from an ancient Greek burial site is similar to a modern organism that causes typhoid fever, an infection spread by contaminated food or water. "Studying the historical aspects of infectious disease can be a powerful tool for several disciplines to learn from," said Dr...

2005-11-14 06:20:00

By James Kilner OSLO -- Warmer, wetter weather brought on by global warming could increase outbreaks of the plague, which has killed millions down the ages and wiped out one third of Europe's population in the 14th century, academics said. Migratory birds spreading avian flu from Asia today could also carry the plague bacteria westward from their source in Central Asia, Nils Stenseth, head of a three-day conference on the plague and how it spreads, told Reuters on Monday. "Wetter, warmer...

2005-10-27 11:05:36

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) - Ethiopia said on Thursday it had discovered 18 new cases of polio in the country and has launched a nationwide vaccination campaign targeting 16 million children. More than 100,000 volunteers and health workers will be fanning out across the Horn of Africa nation to vaccinate 16 million children under the age of five, the Ministry of Health said. "Health experts confirmed 18 cases of wild polio virus have now been detected in Tigray, Amhara and Oromia...

2005-09-28 00:35:00

JAKARTA (Reuters) - Indonesia hopes to hold another polio immunization drive in November to stamp out the disease, an official said on Wednesday, a day after launching a program to vaccinate millions of children for the second time this year. There have been 240 polio cases in Indonesia since May, when the crippling disease re-emerged after being eradicated from the world's fourth most populous country a decade ago. In the two rounds of immunization so far, Indonesia has targeted around 24...


Latest epidemics Reference Libraries

69_91adf9a2d64d7fdcac1a7b084facc7ac
2011-01-12 16:33:15

Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), caused by the dengue virus, is among the spectrum of acute febrile tropical disease and is transmitted by mosquitoes. Occurring mainly in the tropics it can be life threatening and is caused by four closely related virus stereotypes of the genus Flavivirus. It was identified and named in 1779. It has a nickname of "breakbone fever" due to it causing sever generalized bodyache. It tends to be more prevalent in the urban districts of its range...

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Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'