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Latest Epidemiology of suicide Stories

2008-11-20 09:04:21

For the first time, researchers discovered a link between specific psychiatric disorders and increased risk of suicide. New research shows men and women suffering from unipolar disorder (major depression), bipolar disorder (manic depression) or schizophrenia are at a very high risk of committing suicide within a year of their first attempt. Researchers in Stockholm studied close to 40,000 individuals who were admitted to the hospital in Sweden following a suicide attempt. They found that...

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2008-11-12 12:13:04

Every day 85 Americans die by suicide and hundreds of thousands more make attempts every year. The vast majority of recent studies on suicide have focused on identifying psychiatric risk factors. However, a new study by Temple University Sociology Professor Matt Wray, published online this month in Social Science and Medicine, explores time and place as factors in suicide by closely analyzing the patterns of suicide in a single geographic area"”Las Vegas"”over a 30 year period....

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2008-10-21 14:28:41

Researchers reported Tuesday that suicide rates appear to be increasing, with middle-aged white women becoming a rising factor. The overall suicide rate rose 0.7 percent between 1999 and 2005, researchers said. They noticed a disturbing increase, and that the pattern had changed although the reasons behind the change are not clear. The rate for white men aged 40 to 64 rose 2.7 percent and for middle-aged women 3.9 percent, the team at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore reported in the...

2008-08-07 21:00:29

A history of psychiatric disorders or substance abuse is a strong predictor of post-partum suicide attempts, U.S. researchers said. Lead investigator Katherine A. Comtois of the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center and the University of Washington School of Medicine said maternal suicide after giving birth is relatively rare, but suicide attempts often have long-lasting effects on the family and the infant. The researchers used the hospitalization and birth records from...

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2005-07-27 13:25:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) -- Shorter men may be more likely than their taller peers to commit suicide -- suggesting, researchers say, that various factors related to growth and development also affect suicide risk later in life. In a study of records for nearly 1.3 million Swedish men, the investigators found that for every 2 inches a man gained in height, his suicide risk dipped by 9 percent. Overall, the shortest men in the study were about twice as likely as the tallest men to commit...