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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 9:29 EDT
Differences Between Neanderthals And Modern Man Caused By

Differences Between Neanderthals And Modern Man Caused By Genetic Switches

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online With Neanderthals and modern humans sharing more than 99.8 percent of their genetic material, the differences in DNA between the two species are fairly minimal and a new study has found that...

Latest Epigenetics Stories

2014-04-11 10:21:24

ZMYND11 'reads' methylated variant to thwart cancer; tied to breast cancer patient survival A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that's tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. The findings, also published in the journal Nature on April 10, provide evidence in...

2014-04-10 14:53:02

In 10% of human tumors there is a family history of hereditary disease associated with mutations in identified genes. The best examples are the cases of polyps in the large intestine associated with the APC gene and breast cancer associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. In the remaining 90% of cases are believed to have an increased risk of developing cancer in relation to genetic variants less powerful but more often, for example, doubles the risk of having a tumor that lacks this small...

2014-04-08 11:51:42

From time to time, living cells will accidentally make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process. Throughout the history of life, evolution has molded some of these seemingly superfluous genes into a source of genetic novelty, adaptation and diversity. A new study shows one way that some duplicate genes could have long-ago escaped elimination from the genome, leading to the genetic innovation seen in modern life. Researchers have shown that a process called DNA...

2014-04-04 23:35:33

Xtalks presents an informative webinar that will examine the development of flexible targeted bisulfite sequencing tool and how it has been applied in methylation research, on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at 12:00 EDT. Toronto, Canada (PRWEB) April 03, 2014 Epigenetic researchers face a number of challenges in methylation studies related to breadth, depth, throughput and more. Built on Roche NimbleGen’s proprietary probe design and manufacturing technologies, the SeqCap Epi Enrichment System...

2014-04-03 08:30:29

- Company to Present Data on SF3B1 Program at a Symposium During the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014 - CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 3, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- H3 Biomedicine Inc., a biopharmaceutical company specializing in the discovery and development of precision medicines for oncology, announced today that it has named its lead investigational drug candidate for its program that targets SF3B1, a component of the human genetic splicing machinery that has been...

2014-04-01 15:23:26

New research in The FASEB Journal suggests that molecular function of the "hairless" gene may explain why mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of atrichia with papular lesions, a rare form of hair loss It's not a hair-brained idea: A new research report appearing in the April 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal explains why people with a rare balding condition called "atrichia with papular lesions" lose their hair, and it identifies a strategy for reversing this hair loss. Specifically the...

2014-03-31 11:49:22

Since the dawn of civilization people were searching for clues to longevity and trying to extend human lifespan. But only in the past two decades with the advances in genetic sequencing, epigenetic analysis, and increased government investments the area experienced rapid expansion in the knowledge base, allowing scientists to develop comprehensive models and theories of aging. And while there is still much disagreement among scientists, the evolutionary theories are dominating the field....

2014-03-28 09:30:17

Researchers have pinpointed a new mechanism of how natural variation in our DNA alters an individual's risk for developing heart disease by interfering with the ability of a developmental gene to interact with a specialized type of RNA. This work expands on previous work identifying the "hidden" causes of complex disease risk, with the goal of unlocking new pathways and potential drug targets for cardiovascular disease. This latest study led by Thomas Quertermous, MD at Stanford University...

2014-03-27 13:07:49

Results help explain puzzling features of 'dot chromosome' In previous research, UC Berkeley scientists Beatriz Vicoso, Ph.D., and Doris Bachtrog, Ph.D., determined that genes on the so-called "dot chromosome," or fourth chromosome, of the fruit fly Drosophilia melanogaster are X-linked in three other related fly species. These and other findings revealed that the fruit fly's "dot chromosome" had descended from a differentiated X chromosome and suggests that several of the chromosome's...

Simple Blood Test Could Predict Whether A Child Will Become Obese
2014-03-27 10:39:56

University of Southampton Scientists have found that a simple blood test, which can read DNA, could be used to predict obesity levels in children. Researchers at the Universities of Southampton, Exeter and Plymouth used the test to assess the levels of epigenetic switches in the PGC1a gene – a gene that regulates fat storage in the body. Epigenetic switches take place through a chemical change called DNA methylation which controls how genes work and is set during early life. The...