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Latest Epigenetics Stories

crohns research
2014-08-28 03:00:17

Jen Middleton, University of Edinburgh Genetic changes that occur in patients with the bowel condition Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting the illness. Scientists have identified chemical changes in the DNA of patients with Crohn's disease that could help to screen people for the disease. These changes can be detected in blood samples, opening the door to a simple test for Crohn's disease. The findings also offer clues to how the condition develops and reveal possible...

cancer dna fingerprints
2014-08-27 03:00:35

Shawna Williams, Johns Hopkins Medicine Chemical alterations to genes appear key to tumor development Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study of a broad variety of cancers, published online in Genome Medicine on Aug. 26, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA....

Alzheimer's Disease
2014-08-19 03:00:23

Liz French, University of Exeter A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King’s College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer’s disease. Epigenetic changes affect the expression or activity of genes without changing the underlying DNA sequence and are believed to be one mechanism by which the environment can interact with the genome. Importantly, epigenetic changes are...

2014-08-12 12:02:58

Wiezmann Institute of Science Epigenetics has a large say in blood formation Every day trillions of blood cells are being formed in our body: from the oxygen-carrying red blood cells to the many types of white blood cells that fight pathogens and infection. All of these highly specialized cells originate from blood stem cells – unique cells that have the potential to mature into all blood types. How exactly is the fate of these stem cells regulated? Preliminary findings from...

genetic testing for stress
2014-08-06 05:25:46

Rayshell Clapper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Everyone feels stressed out at times; however, for some stress evolves into mental and physical illnesses that lead to even worse illnesses and issues. For these reasons, scientists and doctors have long studied stress looking at what causes stress, how stress affects people, and what can be done to prevent and/or treat stress-related illnesses. On Saturday, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSC)...

2014-08-04 12:49:48

University of Maryland Scientists at the University of Maryland have developed a new, web-based tool that enables researchers to quickly and easily visualize and compare large amounts of genomic information resulting from high-throughput sequencing experiments. The free tool, called Epiviz, was described in a paper published online on August 3, 2014 in the journal Nature Methods. Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized functional genomics. These techniques are key to...

2014-08-04 09:45:12

Duke University Epigenetic control of serotonin transporter makes difference The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person's brain responds to threats, according to a new study by Duke University researchers. The results, which appear online August 3 in Nature Neuroscience, go beyond genetics to help explain why some individuals may be more vulnerable than...

2014-07-28 10:39:26

Baylor College of Medicine Cancer has long been thought to be primarily a genetic disease, but in recent decades scientists have come to believe that epigenetic changes – which don't change the DNA sequence but how it is 'read' – also play a role in cancer. In particular DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group (or molecule), is an epigenetic switch that can stably turn off genes, suggesting the potential to cause cancer just as a genetic mutation can. Until now, however,...

2014-07-23 23:22:00

Transparency Market Research has added a new report titled "Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2013 - 2019" to its report store. Browse the full report: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/histone-deacetylase-inhibitors.html. (PRWEB) July 22, 2014 Histone deacetylase (HDAC) are enzymes which remove acetyl groups from an N-acetyl lysine amino acid present on a histone, thus wrapping the DNA tightly by...

dna single-cell technique
2014-07-22 03:30:21

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) Researchers develop new, powerful single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA Researchers at the BBSRC-funded Babraham Institute, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Single Cell Genomics Centre, have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. The technique can be used to map...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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