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Latest Epigenetics Stories

2013-07-23 13:31:35

New technique can rapidly turn genes on and off, helping scientists better understand their function. Although human cells have an estimated 20,000 genes, only a fraction of those are turned on at any given time, depending on the cell’s needs — which can change by the minute or hour. To find out what those genes are doing, researchers need tools that can manipulate their status on similarly short timescales. That is now possible, thanks to a new...

2013-07-22 10:16:49

Painstaking new analysis of the genetic sequence of the X chromosome—long perceived as the "female" counterpart to the male-associated Y chromosome—reveals that large portions of the X have evolved to play a specialized role in sperm production. This surprising finding, reported by Whitehead Institute scientists in a paper published online this week in the journal Nature Genetics, is paired with another unexpected outcome: despite its reputation as the...

2013-07-11 16:30:16

UBC researchers discover unusual key to regulating cell growth Researchers at the University of British Columbia have discovered a potential new pathway to treat cancer by asking some odd questions about the size of animals. "Mammals display a huge range in size from the largest blue whale to the tiniest fruit bat," says Colby Zaph, assistant professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Biomedical Research Centre, who co-authored the study published in Developmental Cell....

Rate Of Ageing Tied To Birthweight, Metabolites
2013-07-10 10:00:52

Rebekah Eliason for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have discovered a clue towards understanding the rate of ageing and overall health of individuals later in life. Metabolites are leftover chemical fingerprints derived from molecular changes before birth or during infancy that may provide this new insight. King's College London published a study of twins in the International Journal of Epidemiology that emphasized how, through metabolic profiling, 22 metabolites...

Brain Epigenome Changes Through Developmental Years
2013-07-05 14:26:38

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While the entire genome has been sequenced and the codes of many genes have been identified, there are is a wide range of unknown mechanisms that interact with the code without changing "letters" of the DNA. These chemical changes to DNA are referred to as the epigenome, and a new study in the journal Science has revealed significant epigenomic activity during brain development. DNA includes four chemical bases: adenine (A), guanine...

2013-06-28 23:21:51

Special science segment part of Reliv International’s 25th anniversary celebration in Orlando on July 18-20 CHESTERFIELD, MO (PRWEB) June 28, 2013 Reliv International (NASDAQ: RELV) today announced that the company’s 25th anniversary conference in Orlando on July 18-20 will include a presentation on nutritional epigenetics and the science behind the soy peptide lunasin. Presenters will include Dr. Carl Hastings, Reliv chief scientific officer, and Dr. Alfredo Galvez, research...

2013-06-18 13:14:30

Methylation refers to a chemical modification of DNA and this modification can occur in millions of positions in the DNA sequence. Until now, scientists believed that this epigenetic phenomenon actively reduced the expression of certain genes. Today, a team of researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, led by Emmanouil Dermitzakis, Louis-Jeantet Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, reveals that this is not always the case and that DNA methylation may play both a passive...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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