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Latest Epigenetics Stories

2014-05-05 10:12:05

Inhibiting enzymes that cause changes in gene expression could decrease chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer patients, researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Georgia say. Dr. Susanna Greer, associate professor of biology, and research partners at the University of Georgia have identified two enzymes that suppress proteins that are important for regulating cell survival and chemoresistance in ovarian cancer. Their findings are published in the journal, PLOS ONE....

2014-04-30 09:46:46

In research published today in Molecular Psychiatry, a multinational team of scientists presents new evidence supporting the theory that in at least some cases of schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability (ID), malfunctions in some of the same genes are contributing to pathology. The team, the product of an ongoing collaboration between Professors W. Richard McCombie of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and Aiden Corvin of Trinity College, Dublin, studied a type of gene...

2014-04-22 14:14:58

The answer lies in changes in the way our genes work In parallel with modern man (Homo sapiens), there were other, extinct types of humans with whom we lived side by side, such as Neanderthals and the recently discovered Denisovans of Siberia. Yet only Homo sapiens survived. What was it in our genetic makeup that gave us the advantage? The truth is that little is known about our unique genetic makeup as distinguished from our archaic cousins, and how it contributed to the fact that we...

Genetic Switches Explain Differences Between Neanderthals And Modern Man
2014-04-18 10:51:24

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online With Neanderthals and modern humans sharing more than 99.8 percent of their genetic material, the differences in DNA between the two species are fairly minimal and a new study has found that the differences seen in phenotypes are mostly caused by certain genes being “switched on” or “switched off.” According to the study published in the journal Science, genetic switches that affect the size and shape of limbs, as well as those...

2014-04-11 10:21:24

ZMYND11 'reads' methylated variant to thwart cancer; tied to breast cancer patient survival A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that's tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. The findings, also published in the journal Nature on April 10, provide evidence in...

2014-04-10 14:53:02

In 10% of human tumors there is a family history of hereditary disease associated with mutations in identified genes. The best examples are the cases of polyps in the large intestine associated with the APC gene and breast cancer associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. In the remaining 90% of cases are believed to have an increased risk of developing cancer in relation to genetic variants less powerful but more often, for example, doubles the risk of having a tumor that lacks this small...

2014-04-08 11:51:42

From time to time, living cells will accidentally make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process. Throughout the history of life, evolution has molded some of these seemingly superfluous genes into a source of genetic novelty, adaptation and diversity. A new study shows one way that some duplicate genes could have long-ago escaped elimination from the genome, leading to the genetic innovation seen in modern life. Researchers have shown that a process called DNA...

2014-04-04 23:35:33

Xtalks presents an informative webinar that will examine the development of flexible targeted bisulfite sequencing tool and how it has been applied in methylation research, on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at 12:00 EDT. Toronto, Canada (PRWEB) April 03, 2014 Epigenetic researchers face a number of challenges in methylation studies related to breadth, depth, throughput and more. Built on Roche NimbleGen’s proprietary probe design and manufacturing technologies, the SeqCap Epi Enrichment System...

2014-04-03 08:30:29

- Company to Present Data on SF3B1 Program at a Symposium During the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014 - CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 3, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- H3 Biomedicine Inc., a biopharmaceutical company specializing in the discovery and development of precision medicines for oncology, announced today that it has named its lead investigational drug candidate for its program that targets SF3B1, a component of the human genetic splicing machinery that has been...

2014-04-01 15:23:26

New research in The FASEB Journal suggests that molecular function of the "hairless" gene may explain why mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of atrichia with papular lesions, a rare form of hair loss It's not a hair-brained idea: A new research report appearing in the April 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal explains why people with a rare balding condition called "atrichia with papular lesions" lose their hair, and it identifies a strategy for reversing this hair loss. Specifically the...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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