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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 21:24 EDT

Latest epinephrine Stories

2009-03-11 07:08:50

A newly discovered receptor in a strain of Escherichia coli might help explain why people often get sicker when they're stressed.Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are the first to identify the receptor, known as QseE, which resides in a diarrhea-causing strain of E coli. The receptor senses stress cues from the bacterium's host and helps the pathogen make the host ill. A receptor is a molecule on the surface of a cell that docks with other molecules, often signaling the cell to...

2008-07-01 18:00:29

DURHAM, N.C., July 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Two years after Addrenex Pharmaceuticals set it sights on building a new class of drugs to regulate "adrenergic excess," the small Durham company has signed its second major deal with Sciele Pharma, this time to co-develop a new compound for hypertension and other potential indications. Adrenalin is well known as the hormone that triggers the "fight or flight" reaction in response stress or danger. But Addrenex scientists recognized this hormone, and...

2007-01-30 03:00:46

By Niemi, Tomi T; Salmela, Liisa; Aromaa, Ulla; Pyhi, Reino; Rosenberg, Per H Background and Objectives: The surgical site for the creation of an arteriovenous fistula at the lateral aspect of the distal forearm may be faster and more effectively blocked with the infraclavicular coracoid approach than with the axillary approach for brachial plexus block. Methods: Sixty uremic patients scheduled for the creation of an arteriovenous fistula at the forearm were randomized to receive a...

2006-11-11 15:00:26

SAN DIEGO, Nov. 11 /PRNewswire/ -- The majority of patients who use an epinephrine auto-injector prefer Twinject(R) (epinephrine injection, USP 1:1000) after education and training according to a study presented today at the 2006 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting in Philadelphia. The study, entitled "Patient Education and Awareness About the Use of Epinephrine Auto-Injectors," was funded by Verus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a pediatric-oriented...

2006-03-13 11:30:00

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK -- A substantial number of teenagers with food allergies admit to "risk-taking" behavior such as not reading food labels or knowingly eating foods labeled "may contain" allergens, a survey shows. The poll of 174 food-allergic individuals whose average age was 16 years also shows that many of them do not always carry self-injectable epinephrine -- the medication that is immediately needed in the case of a severe allergic reaction. Whether or not they pack their...

2006-03-09 15:08:44

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - It may be possible to administer epinephrine in a tablet -- placed under the tongue -- for the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis, a severe and sometimes fatal allergic reaction, according to research presented this week during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in Miami Beach. Dr. Keith J. Simons from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg and colleagues tested this approach in rabbits, which...

2006-03-06 15:20:01

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Survey results indicate that most food-allergic children who experience severe throat, respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms of anaphylaxis, a potentially fatal allergic reaction, do not receive epinephrine and many do not seek medical attention. For those who do seek medical care, their reported treatment is often suboptimal. The results of this survey suggest that "there is a long way to go to improve the management of allergic...

2006-01-06 15:20:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In a small study of patients with nighttime asthma, a nonprescription inhaler containing epinephrine was nearly as effective as a prescription inhaler dispensing albuterol in terminating an acute asthma flare-up. It is widely believed that nonprescription epinephrine inhalers are less effective and have more adverse effects on the heart than prescription drugs like albuterol, Dr. Leslie Hendeles and colleagues write in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma, and...

2005-08-22 13:07:00

Signs of heart failure may be in the blood. Cardiac researchers at Jefferson Medical College have found an enzyme in the blood that could be a potential marker for heart failure. A team of scientists led by Walter Koch, Ph.D., director of the Center for Translational Medicine in the Department of Medicine in Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, previously showed that an enzyme called GRK2 or beta-adrenergic kinase (ßARK1) is...

2005-07-11 22:45:00

Durham, N.C. "“ Duke University Medical Center researchers have identified a new protein that plays a critical role in enabling the heart to respond to such external stimuli as exercise or stress, as well as in the progressive loss of heart function that is heart failure, the researchers said. Their findings, they said, suggest new approaches to prevent or reverse heart failure, which affects two to three million people in the U.S. The team reports its findings in the August 2005 issue...