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Latest Epithelium Stories

2014-07-10 12:34:40

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO) The pluripotency factor NANOG regulates cell proliferation in epithelia of the skin and oesophagus in adult organisms; blocking the action of the gene diminishes the capacity of tumour cells to divide Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have discovered that NANOG, an essential gene for embryonic stem cells, also regulates cell division in stratified epithelia—those that form part of the epidermis of...

2014-05-23 11:10:34

UCSB UCSB study shows that key protein in epithelial cells plays important roles in how cells sense direction What do sled dogs and cell clusters have in common? According to research by UC Santa Barbara’s Denise Montell, they both travel in groups and need a leader to make sure they all follow in the same direction. Montell, Duggan Professor of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, and colleagues worked on three independent projects involving E-cadherin, a protein found in...

2013-10-15 12:20:24

Villi are small epithelial protrusions that serve to increase the surface area of the gut for efficient nutrient absorption. The mechanism of their formation during development was recently revealed by a study published in Science. The investigations, carried out by two research groups at Harvard University, were complemented by computational modelling carried out at the University of Jyväskylä and funded by the Academy of Finland. Villification (villus formation) has previously been...

2013-07-22 10:23:36

Stowers investigators use genetics and live cell imaging to illuminate molecular mechanisms that position the cell division machinery in growing tissues Constructing a body is like building a house—if you compromise structural integrity, the edifice can collapse. Nowhere is that clearer on a cellular level than in the case of epithelial sheets, single layers of cells that line every body cavity from the gut to mammary glands. As long as epithelial cells pack tightly and...

2013-07-18 23:18:21

ChansPorter™ Assays, developed by ChanTest, provide the best means possible for measuring the functional activity of important pharmaceutical targets, including the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR). Cleveland, OH (PRWEB) July 18, 2013 The new ChansPorter™ Assays provide faster and more accurate answers. Using human (patient-derived) bronchial epithelia, and incorporating higher throughput into the discovery screening and profiling processes increases...

2013-06-27 12:39:52

Scientists at the University of East Anglia have made a major advancement in understanding tissue development that has important implications for cancer. Findings published today in the Journal of Cell Science show how the protein EB2 is a key regulator of tube-like structures inside cells and critical for normal tissue development and function. The findings are an important step in the race to find cures for cancers including gut, breast and pancreatic cancer. Microtubules are...

2012-12-24 15:16:17

Scientists at The University of Manchester have identified how cells know which way up they need to be. The discovery could help in the fight against cancer because in the early stages of the disease the cells become disorganized. Professor Charles Streuli and Dr Nasreen Akhtar of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research have conducted new research that leads to a better understanding of cell polarity. Properly organized tissues are vital to maintaining functional organs and a...

2012-12-19 15:16:02

Discovery could lead to new treatments for respiratory injuries Scarring of the airways can lead to long-term breathing problems for some people exposed to high levels of chlorine gas from events such as an industrial accident, chemical spill following a train derailment or terroristic chemical warfare. Household mishaps from mixing bleach with acidic cleaning products also can cause release of chlorine gas; if this occurs in a poorly ventilated space, chlorine levels could be high enough...

Antimicrobial Drugs Could Come From Eye Proteins
2012-09-25 06:26:24

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley recently discovered that fragments of keratin protein in the eye have the power to prevent pathogens and could possibly be used to develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the study, the group of vision scientists tested synthetic versions of the keratin fragments against pathogens. They discovered that the synthetic fragments were able to eliminate the bacteria that could have...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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