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Latest Erik Trinkaus Stories

Inner Ear Fossil Shakes Up The Understanding Of Human Evolution
2014-07-08 12:25:28

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Originally thought to be a sequential progression, human evolution has been shown to include a rich tapestry of species that interbred over thousands of years. A new study from Washington University in St. Louis has revealed yet another twist in this intricate story of our evolution. Based on the re-examination of an approximately 100,000-year-old early human skull found in Northern China, the new study discovered an inner-ear...

Ancient Human Skulls Show Evidence Of Prevalent Inbreeding
2013-03-19 15:25:55

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Although it is considered completely taboo in most modern societies, an ancient human skull found in northern China suggests inbreeding could have been prevalent among ancient peoples around 100,000 years ago, according to a report in the open access journal PLoS ONE. The skull — which was found at Xujiayao, a mountainous excavation site several hundred miles from the Mongolian border — contained an enlarged parietal...

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2011-01-11 12:00:51

A study published this week says that dying young was not the reason Neanderthals went extinct, adding that that early modern humans had about the same life expectancy as their hairier kin. Scientists have been puzzled over why the Neanderthals disappeared just as modern humans were making huge gains and moving into new parts of Africa and Europe, and some have speculated that a difference in longevity may have been the reason. The study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of...

2010-10-26 14:04:58

An international team of researchers, including a physical anthropology professor at Washington University in St. Louis, has discovered well-dated human fossils in southern China that markedly change anthropologists perceptions of the emergence of modern humans in the eastern Old World. The research, based at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing, was published Oct. 25 in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The...

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2010-01-07 12:00:58

The teeth of a 30,000-year-old child are shedding new light on the evolution of modern humans, thanks to research from the University of Bristol published this week in PNAS. The teeth are part of the remarkably complete remains of a child found in the Abrigo do Lagar Velho, Portugal and excavated in 1998-9 under the leadership of Professor João Zilhão of the University of Bristol.  Classified as a modern human with Neanderthal ancestry, the child...

2009-08-11 13:32:05

U.S. and Canadian scientists say data from human fossils suggest a shift in animal resource exploitation as humans spread into Europe 40,000 years ago. Washington University in St. Louis Professor Erik Trinkaus and University of British Columbia Professor Michael Richards used accumulations of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope data to reach that conclusion. They said both the preceding Neanderthals and the incoming modern humans regularly and successfully hunted large game such as deer,...

2009-08-11 10:17:06

Accumulating carbon and nitrogen stable isotope data from fossil humans in Europe is pointing towards a significant shift in the range of animal resources exploited with the spread of modern humans into Europe 40,000 years ago.Both the preceding Neandertals and the incoming modern humans regularly and successfully hunted large game such as deer, cattle and horses, as well as occasionally killing larger or more dangerous animals. There is little evidence for the regular eating of fish by the...

2009-07-13 13:37:16

A U.S.-led international team of scientists says it has produced the first direct evidence of substantial fish consumption by early modern humans in China. Erik Trinkaus, a professor at the University of Washington in St. Louis, said freshwater fish are an important part of the global diet, but it has been unclear when they became an important part of the year-round diet for early humans. The new research indicates that might have occurred in China about 40,000 years ago. The scientists said...

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2009-05-06 05:40:53

Scientists have used a clay sculpture to recreate the face of the earliest known European. Using an incomplete skull and jawbone retrieved seven years ago by potholers in a cave near the Carpathian Mountains in Romania, Richard Neave, a forensic scientist in the UK, successfully reconstructed the head of the ancient European ancestor. Scientists are unsure of whether the bone fragments belonged to a male or female, but radiocarbon analysis dates the find to between 34,000 and 36,000 years...

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2007-06-25 20:40:00

WASHINGTON -- Researchers studying Neanderthal DNA say it should be possible to construct a complete genome of the ancient hominid despite the degradation of the DNA over time. There is also hope for reconstructing the genome of the mammoth and cave bear, according to a research team led by Svante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Their findings are published in this week's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences....


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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