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Latest Erosion Stories

2013-04-26 23:00:48

Engineers at Draper Laboratory and MIT are working under contract with NASA to develop a statistical model that can identify areas where landslides are most likely to occur so that preparations can be made to better respond to a crisis. CAMBRIDGE, MA (PRWEB) April 26, 2013 Landslides, which can destroy entire communities and are on the rise due to climate change, are more often caused by rainfall accumulated over long periods than single storms. Engineers at Draper Laboratory and MIT are...

Wildfires Can Burn Hot Without Ruining Soil
2013-04-24 08:52:48

American Geophysical Union When scientists torched an entire 22-acre watershed in Portugal in a recent experiment, their research yielded a counterintuitive result: Large, hot fires do not necessarily beget hot, scorched soil. It´s well known that wildfires can leave surface soil burned and barren, which increases the risk of erosion and hinders a landscape´s ability to recover. But the scientists´ fiery test found that the hotter the fire–and the denser the...

2013-04-11 10:38:30

If you've ever stood on a hill during a rainstorm, you've probably witnessed landscape evolution, at least on a small scale: rivulets of water streaming down a slope, cutting deeper trenches in the earth when the rain turns heavier. It's a simple phenomenon that scientists have long believed applies to large-scale landforms as well – that is, rivers cut faster into mountains that receive heavier precipitation. It's thought that if rainfall patterns influence how rivers cut into rock,...

2013-03-06 23:01:47

With winter approaching its peak and severe weather season warming up in the bullpen, the time is now to take proper preventative steps to avoid problems with erosion. A water damage restoration provider explains how. Cleveland OH (PRWEB) March 06, 2013 Restoration Local, one of the leading providers of water and flood damage repair and restoration services in the United States, is offering tips to homeowners on how to prevent erosion from snowmelt or severe thunderstorms. With winter...

The Forming Of Antarctica's Hidden Fjords
2013-03-06 13:41:41

University of Arizona Antarctica's topography began changing from flat to fjord-filled starting about 34 million years ago, according to a new report from a University of Arizona-led team of geoscientists. Knowing when Antarctica's topography started shifting from a flat landscape to one with glaciers, fjords and mountains is important for modeling how the Antarctic ice sheet affects global climate and sea-level rise. Although radar surveys have revealed a rugged alpine landscape...

Scientists Study El Yunque’s Exceptionally Slow Erosion
2013-02-28 20:32:08

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The lush tropical island of Puerto Rico is completely covered with plants and fauna. The exception to this rule resides on the large, majestic, flat-topped promontory known as El Yunque. El Yunque, Spanish for “the anvil,” rises high into the sky above the rivers and streams that run below, and has been a Puerto Rican icon since pre-Columbian times. Researchers from the National Science Foundation´s (NSF)...

Understanding Travel Patterns Of Microbes Blowing In The Wind
2013-02-07 09:32:18

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) With help from a wind tunnel and the latest DNA technology, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists are shedding light on the travel patterns of microbes in soils carried off by strong winds. The work has implications for soil health and could lead to management practices that minimize the damage to soils caused by wind erosion. Wind erosion is an emerging issue in soil conservation efforts. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists...

Using Math To Better Understand River, Valley Networks
2012-12-06 16:23:13

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers wrote in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that they have used math to explain different characteristics of river and valley networks. Rivers and valleys form intricate branching patterns, which have inspired some scientists to develop a theoretical understanding of river-network geometry. MIT scientists have created a mathematical theory to discover a common...

Erosion Can Affect Landscapes In Unexpected Ways
2012-11-13 14:39:06

New York University Erosion caused by flowing water does not only smooth out objects, but can also form distinct shapes with sharp points and edges, a team of New York University researchers has found. Their findings, which appear in the latest edition of the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reveal the unexpected ways that erosion can affect landscapes and artificial materials. The impact of erosion is widely recognized by environmentalists and...


Latest Erosion Reference Libraries

Erosion
2013-04-01 12:48:39

Erosion is the process by which rock and soil are taken from the surface of the Earth by exogenetic processes like wind or the flow of water, and then transported and deposited in another location. While erosion is a natural process, human activities have increased by 10 to 40 times the rate at which erosion is happening globally. Excessive erosion results in problems such as desertification, decreases in agricultural productivity because of land degradation, sedimentation of waterways,...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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