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Latest Erosion Stories

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2011-02-26 08:12:19

Drier conditions projected to result from climate change in the Southwest will likely reduce perennial vegetation cover and result in increased dust storm activity in the future, according to a new study by scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of California, Los Angeles. The research team examined climate, vegetation and soil measurements collected over a 20-year period in Arches and Canyonlands National Parks in southeastern Utah. Long-term data indicated that...

2011-02-23 22:24:34

An assessment of coastal change over the past 150 years has found 68 percent of beaches in the New England and Mid-Atlantic region are eroding, according to a U.S. Geological Survey report released today. Scientists studied more than 650 miles of the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts and found the average rate of coastal change "“ taking into account beaches that are both eroding and prograding -- was negative 1.6 feet per year.  Of those beaches eroding, the most extreme case...

2011-02-23 17:46:53

Much of the Mississippi River's sediment load doesn't come from field runoff, according to work by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Instead, the scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have confirmed that stream bank collapse and failure can be chief contributors to high sediment levels in the silty streams and rivers that flow into the Mississippi. ARS is USDA's chief intramural scientific research agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

2011-02-21 14:19:12

Archaeology is a vital tool in understanding the long-term consequences of human impact on the environment. Computational modeling can refine that understanding. But according to Arizona State University archaeologist C. Michael Barton, it takes a revolution in thought, along with the newest methods of modeling, to produce a comprehensive picture of the past that can help inform land-use decisions for our future. Barton, a professor in ASU's School of Human Evolution and Social Change, will...

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2010-12-15 08:37:34

Locke Island is a small island in a bend of the Columbia River in eastern Washington that plays a special role in the culture of the local Indian tribes. Since the 1970s, however, it has been eroding away at a rate that has alarmed tribal leaders. The island is part of the Hanford Reservation, which is managed by the Department of Energy. So the DOE has turned to a team of researchers headed by David Furbish, professor of earth and environmental sciences (E&ES) at Vanderbilt, to study the...

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2010-12-14 09:55:07

If current climate projections hold true, the forests of the Southwestern United States face a bleak future, with more severe "“"“ and more frequent "“"“ forest fires, higher tree death rates, more insect infestation, and weaker trees. The findings by university and government scientists are published in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). "Our study shows that regardless of rainfall going up or down, forests in the...

2010-11-15 19:40:10

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a sensor that allows engineers to assess the scour potential of soils at various depths and on-site for the first time "“ a technology that will help evaluate the safety of civil infrastructure before and after storm events. Scour, or erosion of soil around structures due to water flow, is responsible for a wide range of critical infrastructure failures "“ from unstable bridges to the levees that gave way in the wake...

2010-11-10 00:53:23

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists in West Virginia are finding ways to improve soil on degraded land so it can be used for sports fields and other uses. Researchers with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) at the agency's Appalachian Farming Systems Research Center (AFSRC) in Beaver, W.Va., are developing constructed or replacement subsoils and topsoils to build better and less-costly sports fields, raingardens and lawns on former landfills, mine lands and other degraded...

2010-11-05 15:39:13

Estimating the long-term impact of agriculture on land is tricky when you don't have much information about what a field was like before it was farmed. Some fields in Missouri started producing crops more than a century ago"”long before anyone kept detailed records about the physical and chemical properties of the soil in a field. Researchers can't go back in time to revisit old fields in their pristine state, but a University of Missouri graduate student did perhaps the next best...

2010-10-19 20:40:36

Researchers say soil in southern Oregon forest remains threatened by practices used a half century ago Clear-cut logging and related road-building in the 1950s and 1960s in southern Oregon's Siskiyou Mountains disrupted soil stability and led to unprecedented soil erosion made worse during heavy rainstorms, report University of Oregon researchers. While logging practices have improved dramatically since then, the damaged landscape -- the removal of low vegetation that helps to protect...


Latest Erosion Reference Libraries

Erosion
2013-04-01 12:48:39

Erosion is the process by which rock and soil are taken from the surface of the Earth by exogenetic processes like wind or the flow of water, and then transported and deposited in another location. While erosion is a natural process, human activities have increased by 10 to 40 times the rate at which erosion is happening globally. Excessive erosion results in problems such as desertification, decreases in agricultural productivity because of land degradation, sedimentation of waterways,...

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