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New DNA Study Reveals Lost History Of The Paleo-Eskimo

New DNA Study Reveals Lost History Of The Paleo-Eskimo People

Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Paleo-Eskimo people that lived in the Arctic from roughly 5,000 years ago to about 700 years ago, were the first humans to live in the region and survived there without outside contact...

Latest Eske Willerslev Stories

America's Short-Lived Clovis People Genetically Mapped For First Time
2014-02-13 07:42:26

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Clovis people lived in America around 13,000 years ago. They hunted mammoth, mastodons and giant bison with big spears. Though they were not the first humans in America, they did represent the first humans with a wide expansion on the North American continent. That is, until the culture mysteriously disappeared only a few hundred years after it emerged. Who the Clovis people were, and what present day humans they are related to...

Woolly Mammoths And Other Megafauna Suffered From A Loss Of Plant Diversity
2014-02-06 09:29:49

[ Watch the Video: Diet Changes Killed Off Woolly Mammoths ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have put forth many theories on why woolly mammoths and other large animals went extinct around 10,000 years ago, from the devastating effects of a comet impact to overhunting by humans. A new DNA-based study published in the journal Nature has found that the flowering plants these “megafauna” depended on disappeared from northern Asia and North America...

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2010-02-10 15:35:00

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have become the first to reconstruct the nuclear genome of an extinct human being. It is the first time an ancient genome has been reconstructed in detail. The innovative technique can be applied to museum materials and ancient remains found in nature and can help reconstructing human phenotypic traits of extinct cultures from where only limited remains have been recovered. It also allows for finding those contemporary populations most closely...

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2009-12-15 08:50:00

Woolly mammoths and prehistoric horses grazed on the North American plains for several thousand years longer than hitherto assumed This is shown by samples of ancient DNA, analyzed by an international team of research scientists under the leadership of Professor Eske Willerslev from Copenhagen University. Analyses of ancient DNA thereby once again revoke results of more common methods of dating, such as carbon 14 analysis of bone and tooth remains from extinct animals. These methods which had...

2009-09-29 10:42:45

A team of Swedish, Danish and British researchers says it used DNA to determine today's Scandinavians are descended from Stone Age immigrants. The researchers said their findings that involve both genetics and archaeology contradict the theory that Scandinavians are descended from the people who came to Scandinavia at the conclusion of the last ice age. The hunter-gatherers who inhabited Scandinavia more than 4,000 years ago had a different gene pool than ours, said Uppsala University...

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2009-09-25 04:50:00

Today's Scandinavians are not descended from the people who came to Scandinavia at the conclusion of the last ice age but, apparently, from a population that arrived later, concurrently with the introduction of agriculture. This is one conclusion of a new study straddling the borderline between genetics and archaeology, which involved Swedish researchers and which has now been published in the journal Current Biology. "The hunter-gatherers who inhabited Scandinavia more than 4,000 years ago...

2009-04-01 09:49:08

In a new study published April 1 in the online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE, ancient DNA (aDNA) is retrieved from various insect remains without destruction of the specimens. Together with eight other authors, Philip Francis Thomsen and Eske Willerslev, from the Centre for Ancient Genetics and Environments, Natural History Museum, University of Copenhagen, use a previously published non-destructive DNA extraction method (Gilbert et al. 2007) to retrieve DNA from ancient...

2008-04-08 00:00:08

By Sandi Doughton SEATTLE - Hold the potty humor, please, but archaeologists digging in a dusty cave in Oregon have unearthed fossilized feces that appear to be the oldest biological evidence of humans in North America. The ancient poop dates back 14,300 years. If the results hold up, that means the continent was populated more than 1,000 years before the so-called Clovis culture, long believed to be the first Americans. "This adds to a growing body of evidence that the human presence...

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2008-04-04 00:50:00

DNA from fossil feces discovered by an international team in south-central Oregon is providing the strongest new evidence that humans inhabited North America up to 1,000 years earlier than previously suspected. Found in Oregon's Paisley Caves, the samples date back over 14,000 years "“ 1,000 years before the Clovis culture. Archaeologist Dennis L. Jenkins of the University of Oregon was a part of the team that discovered the 14 fecal fragments. He said they were able to find very few...

2008-04-04 09:00:12

By Steve Connor Science Editor Textbook accounts of how the Americas were first populated may have to be re-written after the discovery in Oregon of the oldest human DNA ever recorded. The DNA dates from 14,300 years ago - about 1,200 years before the oldest human artifacts produced by the Clovis people, who were thought to be the first inhabitants of North America. The Oregon find suggests that the Clovis people were preceded by cultures who lived along the west coast of North America...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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