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Latest Ethiopia Stories

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2009-06-23 15:00:04

The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said Tuesday that locusts coming from northern Somalia by the swarms are putting crops in Ethiopia at risk of being destroyed. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) "reports that locust swarms have been confirmed in seven regions in the country, including in areas where there is no previous record of infestation," a statement said. "The government is expected to present a response plan specifying immediate and...

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2009-04-24 06:40:25

Botanists discovered a pink-flowered tree in Ethiopia that has been overlooked by generations of researchers. The acacia fumosa tree is located in a war zone so it was not "found" for scientific purposes until 2006-7. "I have spent a lifetime looking at plants and describing species -- it knocked me sideways when I heard about this tree," said David Mabberley of the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, England. "The total numbers must be in the millions," he said of the 20-foot tall tree that...

2009-02-19 09:28:00

2008 Chicago Winners, Olympians, and Additional Talent Join the Elite Team to Challenge Defending Champions BOSTON, Feb. 19 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- John Hancock Financial today announced that the top contenders for the Boston Marathon this year include an elite group of Olympians, top Americans and international marathon winners. These athletes will challenge four-time winner Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot of Kenya and defending women's champion Dire Tune of Ethiopia at the 113th running of the...

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2009-01-25 15:03:38

Officials from the Seattle Science Center paid millions to show the fossil remains of one of the earliest known human ancestors, but the exhibit failed to produce the expected returns. President Bryce Seidl said on Friday the Pacific Science Center faces a half-million-dollar loss resulting in layoffs of 8 percent of the staff, furloughs and a wage freeze only halfway through the five-month exhibit. The museum spotlighted the 3.2 million-year-old fossilized partial skeleton of a species with...

2009-01-21 07:00:00

Drugs for Malaria and HIV/AIDS a High Priority ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, Jan. 21 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Rx for Africa, Inc.'s (Pink Sheets: RXAF.PK) wholly owned operating subsidiary, Rx Africa (Ethiopia) P.L.C. announced today that it's newly completed R&D center has formulated nine generic pharmaceuticals, and is on track to launch a minimum of 36 new products in calendar 2009. The state of the art malaria drug Artemisinin is scheduled for a third-quarter launch, and HIV/AIDS...

2008-12-01 07:07:00

SANTA MONICA, Calif., Dec. 1 /PRNewswire/ -- TOMS Shoes, the philanthropic footwear company, has launched a holiday campaign online at TOMSshoes.com, encouraging people to Spend Less and Give More this holiday season. For 30 days, from November 20th through December 20th, TOMS is asking holiday shoppers to help give 30,000 pairs of shoes to children in Ethiopia suffering from a debilitating disease that is 100% preventable by wearing shoes. By purchasing a pair of shoes for men, women or...

2008-12-04 02:24:00

ADDIS ABEBA, Ethiopia, December 4 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Nokia (NYSE: NOK) and Nokia Siemens Networks announced their partnership with Save the Children Finland to help alleviate the existing water problem made worse by the current drought in Alaba Special Woreda through collaboration with the Woreda administration and its relevant offices. The collaboration between Nokia, Nokia Siemens Networks and Save the Children Finland was initiated as a response to the urgent needs of...

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2008-11-14 08:00:00

According to researchers, a wide-hipped Homo erectus fossil found in Ethiopia suggests that females of the pre-human species gave birth to developed babies with large heads. The finding leads some researchers to believe that helpless babies came along late in human evolution. "We could look at this pelvis and then, using a series of measurements, we can calculate ... how big the baby's head could be at birth," said Scott Simpson, a paleontologist at Case Western Reserve University. Simpson...

2008-10-27 15:00:22

Over 1000 high school and college students in under-resourced and under-served backgrounds on five continents joined together to celebrate their interests in education, medicine, science & technology, math, engineering, and social science in the "5th Annual Global Harlem Science Street Fairs & Festivals," organized by Harlem Children Society International (HCS) on Saturday, September 27th. In a simultaneous series of worldwide events linked together through a global webcast, the...

2008-10-11 06:00:13

Text of report in English by Japan's largest news agency Kyodo Nairobi, Oct. 10 Kyodo - A Japanese female doctor abducted in Ethiopia in September told a Somali journalist over the phone on Friday that she and another aid worker are safe in the Somali capital Mogadishu. The woman, who identified herself as Keiko Akahane, said the abductors want the release of prisoners held in Ethiopia, not ransom, in exchange for freeing the two aid workers, according to the Somali journalist who is...


Latest Ethiopia Reference Libraries

African Wild Ass, Equus africanus
2014-04-30 11:15:27

The African wild ass (Equus africanus) is a species within the Equidae family that is thought to be that ancestor of the domestic donkey. This species resides in arid habitats in a range that includes the Horn of Africa, Somalia, Ethiopia, and Eritrea. This species hold four subspecies, including the Somali wild ass and the Nubian wild ass. The African wild ass reaches an average body length of 6.6 feet, a height between 12.1 and 14.1 hands at the shoulders, and a weight between 510 and...

Nile Lechwe, Kobus megaceros
2012-09-10 17:01:29

The Nile lechwe (Kobus megaceros), a species of antelope, is also known as Mrs Gray's lechwe, the waterbuck, or the wasserbock. It can be found in Ethiopia and Sudan, where it prefers a habitat within grasslands, steppes, wetlands, coastal areas, or swamplands with water reaching a depth between 3.9 and 16 inches. Leopold Fitzinger first described this antelope in 1855. The Nile lechwe varies in size depending on sex, with males typically reaching a weight of up to 260 pounds and females...

Walia Ibex, Capra walie
2012-08-29 12:21:36

The walia ibex (Capra walie), sometimes considered to be a subspecies of the Alpine ibex, and can be found in a highly restricted range in the Semien Mountains in Ethiopia. It prefers a habitat within rocky areas, subalpine grasslands, scrubs, and mountain forests at an elevation between 8,200 and 14,800 feet. This ibex is also known as the Abyssinian ibex. The walia ibex is typical dark brown to red brown in color, with a grey brown muzzle and lighter grey legs. The underbelly and insides...

Dromedary Camel, Camelus dromedarius
2012-08-24 14:19:35

The dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), also known as the Arabian camel, is a completely domesticated species that appears on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Domesticated”. It is thought that when wild, its native range was mainly in the Arabian Peninsula. It can now be found in South Asia, North Africa, and the Middle East. The only dromedary camels that display wild behaviors are the population of feral camels in Australia, which were introduced in 1840. It prefers a...

Dibatag, Ammodorcas clarkei
2012-08-05 21:14:48

The dibatag (Ammodorcas clarkei), also known as Clarke's gazelle, is native to Somalia and Ethiopia. Its range is significantly smaller than it once was, and in many areas, populations are fragmented. In the region of Ogaden, where it was once abundant, the northern populations have dwindled due to human civilizations taking over. In southern Ogaden, it is still present in acceptable numbers, most likely due to the natural vegetation and habitat required to sustain it. It prefers a habitat...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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