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Latest Ethiopia Stories

2012-07-05 10:21:12

Maps reveal animal-borne disease as heavy burden for 1 billion of world's poor; new evidence on zoonotic emerging disease hotspots in US and Western Europe A new global study mapping human-animal diseases like tuberculosis (TB) and Rift Valley fever finds that an "unlucky" 13 zoonoses are responsible for 2.4 billion cases of human illness and 2.2 million deaths per year. The vast majority occur in low- and middle-income countries. The report, which was conducted by the International...

2012-06-21 21:04:28

Diversity within Ethiopian genomes reveals imprints of historical events Researchers have started to unveil the genetic heritage of Ethiopian populations, who are among the most diverse in the world, and lie at the gateway from Africa. They found that the genomes of some Ethiopian populations bear striking similarities to those of populations in Israel and Syria, a potential genetic legacy of the Queen of Sheba and her companions. The team detected mixing between some Ethiopians and...

2012-05-19 23:03:58

DuPont Chair and CEO Ellen Kullman announced two key efforts that will support collaborative, world hunger initiatives. Washington, DC (PRWEB) May 18, 2012 DuPont Chair and CEO Ellen Kullman today announced two key efforts that will support collaborative, world hunger initiatives. First, DuPont will invest more than $3 million over the next three years to help smallholder farmers in Ethiopia to achieve food security. Second, DuPont is sponsoring an innovative Global Food Security Index...


Latest Ethiopia Reference Libraries

African Wild Ass, Equus africanus
2014-04-30 11:15:27

The African wild ass (Equus africanus) is a species within the Equidae family that is thought to be that ancestor of the domestic donkey. This species resides in arid habitats in a range that includes the Horn of Africa, Somalia, Ethiopia, and Eritrea. This species hold four subspecies, including the Somali wild ass and the Nubian wild ass. The African wild ass reaches an average body length of 6.6 feet, a height between 12.1 and 14.1 hands at the shoulders, and a weight between 510 and...

Nile Lechwe, Kobus megaceros
2012-09-10 17:01:29

The Nile lechwe (Kobus megaceros), a species of antelope, is also known as Mrs Gray's lechwe, the waterbuck, or the wasserbock. It can be found in Ethiopia and Sudan, where it prefers a habitat within grasslands, steppes, wetlands, coastal areas, or swamplands with water reaching a depth between 3.9 and 16 inches. Leopold Fitzinger first described this antelope in 1855. The Nile lechwe varies in size depending on sex, with males typically reaching a weight of up to 260 pounds and females...

Walia Ibex, Capra walie
2012-08-29 12:21:36

The walia ibex (Capra walie), sometimes considered to be a subspecies of the Alpine ibex, and can be found in a highly restricted range in the Semien Mountains in Ethiopia. It prefers a habitat within rocky areas, subalpine grasslands, scrubs, and mountain forests at an elevation between 8,200 and 14,800 feet. This ibex is also known as the Abyssinian ibex. The walia ibex is typical dark brown to red brown in color, with a grey brown muzzle and lighter grey legs. The underbelly and insides...

Dromedary Camel, Camelus dromedarius
2012-08-24 14:19:35

The dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), also known as the Arabian camel, is a completely domesticated species that appears on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Domesticated”. It is thought that when wild, its native range was mainly in the Arabian Peninsula. It can now be found in South Asia, North Africa, and the Middle East. The only dromedary camels that display wild behaviors are the population of feral camels in Australia, which were introduced in 1840. It prefers a...

Dibatag, Ammodorcas clarkei
2012-08-05 21:14:48

The dibatag (Ammodorcas clarkei), also known as Clarke's gazelle, is native to Somalia and Ethiopia. Its range is significantly smaller than it once was, and in many areas, populations are fragmented. In the region of Ogaden, where it was once abundant, the northern populations have dwindled due to human civilizations taking over. In southern Ogaden, it is still present in acceptable numbers, most likely due to the natural vegetation and habitat required to sustain it. It prefers a habitat...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.