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Latest European Corn Borer Stories

Corn Pest Decline Could Save Farmers Money
2013-12-19 12:41:36

Penn State Populations of European corn borer (ECB), a major corn crop pest , have declined significantly in the eastern United States, according to Penn State researchers. The decline suggests that the use of genetically modified, ECB-resistant corn hybrids -- an expensive, yet effective, solution that has been widely adopted by farmers -- may now be unnecessary in some areas. "ECB, which was introduced to North America from Europe in the 1900s, used to be the most important pest of...

Love At First Sniff For Male Moths
2013-04-17 13:51:05

University of California - Riverside UC Riverside entomologists focus on moth pheromones to explain high proportion of hybrid moths in nature An international team of researchers, including an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside, has an explanation for why we see so many hybrid moths in nature. The team closely examined the behavior and the olfactory circuitry of male moths and found an answer in female-produced pheromones – chemicals generally consisting of a...

Gene Mutation In Male Moth Allows It To Detect Female Even When Scent Is Altered
2012-08-15 13:54:51

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Because of a single gene mutation on the antenna of a male moth, he is able to receive a female moth´s Hail Mary pheromone pass from end zone-to-end zone even if she were to alter its scent. According to a report published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a team of researchers led by Montana State University entomologist Kevin Wanner identified the gene in male moths responsible for...

2012-07-23 23:01:24

The novel Natural Sciences Bibliographic Web Portal published by TriScience.com aims to provide comprehensive bibliographic information on the basic and applied life, earth and health sciences and has just opened its web portal. The publishers target to publish a total of over 21 million references until 2014. These references contain a minimum of bibliographic information including title, author(s), publication year and source. Almost 11 million of these references additionally contain a...

2011-10-19 13:08:44

Scientists have developed Bt toxins for the management of Bt resistance in European corn borer and other crop pests. Toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria (Bt toxins) are used in organic and conventional farming to manage pest insects. Sprayed as pesticides or produced in genetically modified plants, Bt toxins, used in pest control since 1938, minimize herbivory in crops, such as vegetables, maize or cotton. Since 1996, Bt producing transgenic crops have been grown, which...

2010-10-08 02:25:33

Areawide suppression dramatically reduced the estimated $1 billion in annual losses caused by European corn borer Transgenic corn's resistance to pests has benefitted even non-transgenic corn, a new study led by scientists from the University of Minnesota shows. The study, published in the Oct. 8 edition of the journal Science, found that widespread planting of genetically modified Bt corn throughout the Upper Midwest has suppressed populations of the European corn borer, historically one of...

2010-10-08 02:21:08

Widespread planting of genetically modified Bt corn throughout the Upper Midwest has suppressed populations of the European corn borer, a major insect pest of corn, with the majority of the economic benefits going to growers who do not plant Bt corn, reports a multistate team of scientists in the Oct. 8 edition of the journal Science. In Wisconsin, 75 percent of the $325 million cumulative economic benefit linked to Bt corn's pest suppression between 1996-2009 went to non-Bt corn growers....

2010-10-08 02:18:50

Transgenic corn's suppression of the European corn borer has saved Midwest farmers billions of dollars in the past decade, reports a new study in Science. Research conducted by several Midwest universities shows that suppression of this pest has saved $3.2 billion for corn growers in Illinois, Minnesota, and Wisconsin over the past 14 years with more than $2.4 billion of this total benefiting non-Bt corn growers. Comparable estimates for Iowa and Nebraska are $3.6 billion in total, with $1.9...

2010-10-08 02:17:52

A group of agricultural scientists reported in today's issue of the journal Science that corn that has been genetically engineered to produce insect-killing proteins isolated from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provides significant economic benefits even to neighboring farmers who grow non-transgenic varieties of corn. "Modern agricultural science is playing a critical role in addressing many of the toughest issues facing American agriculture today, including pest management...

759c8c9646458daef3fe2adcc4af54b5
2010-07-01 07:10:31

Sex pheromone production in European corn borer races explored -- tracking the origin of new species The coming of summer brings promise for humans and insects alike. The farmer planted maize for a bountiful harvest, but the European Corn Borer (ECB) is looking for a good meal right away. The caterpillars of this pest bore deep into the maize stems, where they eat the inner pith causing the weakened stalks to fall over before the ears can ripen. As if one pest were not bad enough, there are...


Latest European Corn Borer Reference Libraries

40_238e445f426fb003a4314e1e897beba5
2005-09-09 11:07:32

The Pyralidae or snout-moths are a family of Lepidoptera (moths). In many classifications, the Crambidae or grass-moths have been treated as a sub-division of the Pyralidae, the combination being one of the largest families in the Lepidoptera. The latest review by Munroe & Solis, in Kristensen (1999) retains the Crambidae as a full family. Harmful Pyralids Sunflower moth Homoeosoma nebulella Meal Moth Pyralis farinalis - cosmopolitan, larvae infest store grain European Corn Borer...

0_d2fceef818795847eeab3342f7cbec28
2005-09-09 07:43:22

PHOTO CAPTION: Crambus perlella (Photo taken by Keith Edkins) The Crambidae are a family of Lepidoptera (moths). They are quite variable in appearance and the nominal subfamily, Crambinae (grass moths) take up closely folded postures on grass-stems where they are inconspicuous. Other subfamilies include brightly colored and patterned insects which rest in wing-spread attitudes. In many classifications, the Crambidae have been treated as a sub-division of the Pyralidae or snout-moths....

37_233c80e757c8e3d81a6c00e9cc839e5a
2005-07-14 11:19:06

The Crambidae are a family of Lepidoptera (moths). They are quite variable in appearance, the nominal subfamily Crambinae (or grass moths) taking up closely folded postures on grass-stems where they are inconspicuous, while other subfamilies include brightly colored and patterned insects which rest in wing-spread attitudes. In many classifications the Crambidae have been treated as a sub-division of the Pyralidae or snout-moths. The chief difference is a structure in the ears called the...

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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