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Latest European Geosciences Union Stories

Earth’s CO2 And Climate Stabilized By Ancient Forests
2014-01-24 12:38:58

European Geosciences Union UK researchers have identified a biological mechanism that could explain how the Earth’s atmospheric carbon dioxide and climate were stabilized over the past 24 million years. When CO2 levels became too low for plants to grow properly, forests appear to have kept the climate in check by slowing down the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The results are now published in Biogeosciences, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)....

Temperature Increase Puts Terrestrial Ecosystems At Risk Of Major Shifts
2013-10-08 11:39:45

European Geosciences Union Over 80% of the world's ice-free land is at risk of profound ecosystem transformation by 2100, a new study reveals. "Essentially, we would be leaving the world as we know it," says Sebastian Ostberg of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany. Ostberg and collaborators studied the critical impacts of climate change on landscapes and have now published their results in Earth System Dynamics, an open access journal of the European Geosciences...

Tiny Plankton May Have Big Impact On Climate
2013-09-13 14:28:37

European Geosciences Union As the climate changes and oceans' acidity increases, tiny plankton seem set to succeed. An international team of marine scientists has found that the smallest plankton groups thrive under elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. This could cause an imbalance in the food web as well as decrease ocean CO2 uptake, an important regulator of global climate. The results of the study, conducted off the coast of Svalbard, Norway, in 2010, are now compiled in a special...

Could Planting Trees In The Desert Take The Edge Off Climate Change?
2013-07-31 12:51:58

European Geosciences Union As the world starts feeling the effects of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide and consequent global temperature rise, researchers are looking for a Plan B to mitigate climate change. A group of German scientists has now come up with an environmentally friendly method that they say could do just that. The technique, dubbed carbon farming, consists in planting trees in arid regions on a large scale to capture CO2. They publish their study today in Earth System...

2013-05-17 10:59:24

Researchers have shown that, by using global positioning systems (GPS) to measure ground deformation caused by a large underwater earthquake, they can provide accurate warning of the resulting tsunami in just a few minutes after the earthquake onset. For the devastating Japan 2011 event, the team reveals that the analysis of the GPS data and issue of a detailed tsunami alert would have taken no more than three minutes. The results are published on 17 May in Natural Hazards and Earth System...

2012-08-01 23:08:42

Most of the world's population will be subject to degraded air quality in 2050 if man-made emissions continue as usual. In this 'business-as-usual' scenario, the average world citizen 40 years from now will experience similar air pollution to that of today's average East Asian citizen. These conclusions are those of a study published today in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, an Open Access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). Air pollution is a major health risk that may...

Space Mirrors Won't Fix Climate Change
2012-06-06 12:00:59

Michael Crumbliss for redOrbit.com Geoengineering is a field of study that proposes techniques to reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Methods range from mimicking the effects of large volcanic eruptions by releasing sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere to deploying giant mirrors in space. Scientists have proposed these sunlight-reflecting solutions as last-ditch attempts to halt global warming. A new study used climate models developed by the UK Met...

Image 1 - Fukushima Still Faces Earthquake Risk
2012-02-14 12:04:46

Seismic risk at the Fukushima nuclear plant increased after the magnitude 9 earthquake that hit Japan last March, scientists report. The new study, which uses data from over 6,000 earthquakes, shows the 11 March tremor caused a seismic fault close to the nuclear plant to reactivate. The results are now published in Solid Earth, an open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). The research suggests authorities should strengthen the security of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear...

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2011-04-09 06:05:00

New forecasts on rising sea levels suggest that New York will be a big loser, while some regions, including those closer to polar regions, will win big, reports BBC News.. A 2007 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change forecast sea levels to rise by as much as 1 foot by 2100. But that forecast was a global average. A Dutch team has now made an attempt to model all the factors leading to regional variations. And whatever the global figure turns out to be, there will be...

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2011-04-07 13:35:00

Scientists have calculated that the Earth sees about 760 thunderstorms every hour. The figure is substantially lower than numbers that have been used for nearly a century. The new research, which was unveiled at a recent European Geosciences Union meeting, uses a global network of monitoring stations that detect the electromagnetic pulses produced by major bolts of lightning. The scientists confirmed that thunderstorms are mainly a tropical phenomenon, and the Congo basin is the global...