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Latest European honey bee Stories

2012-08-07 02:30:27

FIRESTONE, Colo., Aug. 7, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Honey has been in the news recently, covering topics from its source to its authenticity. The National Honey Board (NHB), a federal research and promotion board with United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) oversight, wants to clarify any misconceptions. The NHB utilized industry, culinary and educational resources to produce "The Story of Honey," which captures the many positives of honey, from being a vital component of a healthy...

2012-07-19 07:34:11

Scientists have discovered a way to make worker bees produce an enhanced version of royal jelly (RJ) — the super-nutritious substance that dictates whether larvae become workers or queens, and that is also renowned as a health supplement for people. Their study, which found that the super RJ that makes queen bee larvae grow 2-3 times larger than normal, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Chia-Nan Chen and colleagues explain that royal jelly is a thick liquid...

2012-03-30 10:28:21

Research from North Carolina State University shows that honey bees “self-medicate” when their colony is infected with a harmful fungus, bringing in increased amounts of antifungal plant resins to ward off the pathogen. “The colony is willing to expend the energy and effort of its worker bees to collect these resins,” says Dr. Michael Simone-Finstrom, a postdoctoral research scholar in NC State´s Department of Entomology and lead author of a paper describing...

2012-03-15 21:37:13

Japanese honeybees face a formidable foe in the Asian giant hornet, a fierce predator that can reach 40mm long or larger, but the bees have developed a novel defense mechanism: they create a "hot defensive bee ball," swarming around the hornet and literally cooking it. Now, a new study published Mar. 14 in the open access journal PLoS ONE uncovers some of the neural activity that underlies this unusual behavior, which is not practiced by the Japanese honeybee's European relative. The...

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2012-03-14 11:15:55

A new Wellesley College study shows that a queen bee´s promiscuity benefits the hive. Dr. Heather Mattila studied the lives of bee colonies and discovered that the more genetically diverse the worker bee, the healthier they are. These bees become so genetically diverse when the queen bee mates with multiple bees. Research in bees has been growing in recent years in order to better understand and protect them. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the honey bee population...

Bees Seek Adventure, Studies Show
2012-03-11 05:38:49

Humans aren´t the only species on Planet Earth to seek thrills and adventure. A new study posted in the journal Science explains that honey bees are just as likely as human beings to seek an adrenaline high. Molecular pathways in the brain that are often associated with thrill-seeking were found in honey bees as well. Often thought to be diligent in roles given to them by the hive, this new study shows that honey bees may have wants and desires other than serving the queen of the...

Bumblebees Learn To Take Cues From Honeybees
2012-02-15 04:29:01

Bumblebees can use cues from their rivals the honeybees to learn where the best food resources are, according to new research from Queen Mary, University of London. Writing in the journal PLoS ONE, the team from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences explain how they trained a colony of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to use cues provided by a different species, the honeybee (Apis mellifera), as well as cues provided by fellow bumblebees to locate food resources on...

Image 1 - Parasitic Fly Likely Culprit in Bizarre ‘Zombie’ Bee Behavior
2012-01-04 15:08:25

Scientists suspect that a parasitic fly that preys on honey bees could be the cause behind the alarming phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder (CCD), in which thousands of worker bees exhibit bizarre behavior before suddenly vanishing from their colony. Since the problem was first observed in the U.S. in 2006, experts have been attempting to explain the strange ℠zombie-like´ behavior in usually robotically predictable worker bees. European scientists have also joined in to...

Bee Behavior Mimics Brain Neuron Function
2011-12-09 07:40:14

A new study of bees has come to the conclusion that bee swarm communication works similarly to that of neurons in the human brain. The study, published in the December 9 issue of Science, found that bees use inhibitory “stop” signals to prohibit the scout bees from completing a waggle dance that helps bees learn the directions of competing sites for new hives. This behavior helps to ensure that the best homesite is found for the hive. Thomas Seeley, a biologist from Cornell...

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2011-06-27 07:05:40

Fruits and vegetables that provide the highest levels of vitamins and minerals to the human diet globally depend heavily on bees and other pollinating animals, according to a new study published in the international online journal PLoS ONE. The new study was carried out by an interdisciplinary research team, comprised of pollination ecologists and a nutrition expert, based at the Leuphana University of Lneburg, the University of Berlin in Germany, and the University of California at Berkeley...


Latest European honey bee Reference Libraries

Honeybee
2005-09-08 09:11:58

The honeybee is a colonial insect that is often maintained, fed, and transported by farmers. Honeybees are a subset of bees which fall into the Order Hymenoptera and Suborder Apocrita. Of the approximately 20,000 known species of bees, four are considered honeybees: Apis florea, Apis dorsata, Apis cerana, and Apis mellifera (Western honeybee). It is thought that they have been domesticated at least since the time of the building of the Egyptian pyramids. Honeybees store honey (which is...

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