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Counting Fish Teeth Reveals Regulatory DNA Changes Behind

Counting Fish Teeth Reveals Regulatory DNA Changes Behind Rapid Evolution, Adaptation

Robert Sanders, University of California - Berkeley Sticklebacks, the roaches of the fish world, are the ideal animal in which to study the genes that control body shape. They’ve moved from the ocean into tens of thousands of freshwater...

Latest Evolution Stories

Single Evolutionary Road May Lead To Rome
2014-09-10 03:52:50

Michigan State University A well-known biologist once theorized that many roads led to Rome when it comes to two distantly related organisms evolving a similar trait. A new paper, published in Nature Communications, suggests that when it comes to evolving some traits – especially simple ones – there may be a shared gene, one road, that’s the source. Jason Gallant, MSU zoologist and the paper’s first author, focused on butterflies to illustrate his metaphorical roadmap on...

dodo bird
2014-09-04 03:30:00

David Orenstein, Brown University The gravity of the world’s current extinction rate becomes clearer upon knowing what it was before people came along. A new estimate finds that species die off as much as 1,000 times more frequently nowadays than they used to. That’s 10 times worse than the old estimate of 100 times. It’s hard to comprehend how bad the current rate of species extinction around the world has become without knowing what it was before people came along. The newest...

Polypterus senegalus
2014-09-01 04:00:02

Cynthia Lee, McGill University About 400 million years ago a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods – today's amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and fins in a terrestrial environment and what evolutionary processes were at play remain scientific mysteries. Researchers at McGill University published in the journal Nature, turned to a living fish, called Polypterus, to help show what might have...

cicada
2014-09-01 02:10:59

John McCutcheon, The University of Montana Two is company, three is a crowd. But in the case of the cicada, that’s a good thing. Until a recent discovery by a University of Montana research lab, it was thought that cicadas had a symbiotic relationship with two important bacteria that live within the cells of its body. Since the insect eats a simple diet consisting solely of plant sap, it relies on these bacteria to produce the nutrients it needs for survival. In exchange, those two...

Hybrid poplar trees
2014-08-26 02:45:23

David Gilbert, DOE/Joint Genome Institute One aspect of the climate change models researchers have been developing looks at how plant ranges might shift, and how factors such as temperature, water availability, and light levels might come into play. Forests creeping steadily north and becoming established in the thawing Arctic is just one of the predicted effects of rising global temperatures. A recent study published online August 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics offers a more in-depth,...

ants sympatric speciation
2014-08-25 03:00:57

Peter Iglinski, University of Rochester A newly-discovered species of ant supports a controversial theory of species formation. The ant, only found in a single patch of eucalyptus trees on the São Paulo State University campus in Brazil, branched off from its original species while living in the same colony, something thought rare in current models of evolutionary development. “Most new species come about in geographic isolation,” said Christian Rabeling, assistant professor of...

honeybee evolution
2014-08-25 06:27:46

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Honeybees are more genetically diverse than originally thought, and the species might have originated from Asia and not Africa as previously believed, according to new research published online Sunday in the journal Nature Genetics. As part of their study, researchers from the Uppsala University Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology and an international team of colleagues present the first global analysis of genome...

paleontological reconstruction of rangeomorph fronds
2014-08-13 04:00:43

University of Cambridge New three-dimensional reconstructions show how some of the earliest animals on Earth developed, and provide some answers as to why they went extinct. A bizarre group of uniquely shaped organisms known as rangeomorphs may have been some of the earliest animals to appear on Earth, uniquely suited to ocean conditions 575 million years ago. A new model devised by researchers at the University of Cambridge has resolved many of the mysteries around the structure,...

Galápagos Hawks Hand Down Lice Like Family Heirlooms
2014-08-11 03:08:49

By Daniel Stolte, University of Arizona Study provides some of the first evidence for the hypothesis of co-divergence between parasites and hosts acting as a major driver of biodiversity Say what you will about the parasitic lifestyle, but in the evolution of life on Earth, it's a winner. Given that about half of all known species are parasites, biologists have long hypothesized that the strategy of leeching off other organisms is a major driver of biodiversity. Studying populations...

african elephants
2014-07-25 02:00:22

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Sense of smell is critical for survival in many mammals. The ability to distinguish different odors, which is important for sniffing out food, avoiding predators, and finding mates, depends on the number and type olfactory receptors found in an organism's genome. In a study published this week in Genome Research, researchers examined the olfactory receptor (OR) repertoire encoded in 13 mammalian species and found that African elephants have the largest number...


Latest Evolution Reference Libraries

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.