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Latest Evolution Stories

paleontological reconstruction of rangeomorph fronds
2014-08-13 04:00:43

University of Cambridge New three-dimensional reconstructions show how some of the earliest animals on Earth developed, and provide some answers as to why they went extinct. A bizarre group of uniquely shaped organisms known as rangeomorphs may have been some of the earliest animals to appear on Earth, uniquely suited to ocean conditions 575 million years ago. A new model devised by researchers at the University of Cambridge has resolved many of the mysteries around the structure,...

Galápagos Hawks Hand Down Lice Like Family Heirlooms
2014-08-11 03:08:49

By Daniel Stolte, University of Arizona Study provides some of the first evidence for the hypothesis of co-divergence between parasites and hosts acting as a major driver of biodiversity Say what you will about the parasitic lifestyle, but in the evolution of life on Earth, it's a winner. Given that about half of all known species are parasites, biologists have long hypothesized that the strategy of leeching off other organisms is a major driver of biodiversity. Studying populations...

african elephants
2014-07-25 02:00:22

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Sense of smell is critical for survival in many mammals. The ability to distinguish different odors, which is important for sniffing out food, avoiding predators, and finding mates, depends on the number and type olfactory receptors found in an organism's genome. In a study published this week in Genome Research, researchers examined the olfactory receptor (OR) repertoire encoded in 13 mammalian species and found that African elephants have the largest number...

Anopheles stephensi mosquito
2014-07-21 03:30:31

Kristen Kusek, Harvard University New genome editing tool offers strategy to manage insect-borne disease A cross-disciplinary team is calling for public discussion about a potential new way to solve longstanding global ecological problems by using an emerging technology called “gene drives.” The advance could potentially lead to powerful new ways of combating malaria and other insect-borne diseases, controlling invasive species and promoting sustainable agriculture. Representing...

2014-07-18 12:53:40

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Scientists identify a gene that controls the timing of precisely ordered events during maturation Closely related organisms share most of their genes, but these similarities belie major differences in behavior, intelligence, and physical appearance. For example, we share nearly 99% of our genes with chimps, our closest relatives on the great "tree of life." Still, the differences between the two species are unmistakable. If not just genes, what else...

Friends Found To Be Genetically More Similar Than Strangers
2014-07-15 11:59:03

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you’ve ever thought of your circle of friends as a second family, you may be on to something as a new study has found that on a population-wide level friends are more closely related to each other than strangers. Published in the in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study indicated that friends who are not biologically related, may be similar to each other genetically. "Looking across the whole genome,"...

Running For Life: How Speed Restricts Evolutionary Change Of The Vertebral Column
2014-07-15 03:30:37

Naturalis Biodiversity Center One of the riddles of mammal evolution explained: the strong conservation of the number of trunk vertebrae. Researchers of the Naturalis Biodiversity Center and the University of Utah show that this conservation is probably due to the essential role of speed and agility in survival of fast running mammals. They measured variation in vertebrae of 774 individual mammal skeletons of both fast and slow running species. The researchers found that a combination of...

2014-07-11 10:58:16

University of Cambridge When a pregnant mother is undernourished, her child is at a greater than average risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes, in part due to so-called 'epigenetic' effects. A new study in mice demonstrates that this 'memory' of nutrition during pregnancy can be passed through sperm of male offspring to the next generation, increasing risk of disease for her grandchildren as well. In other words, to adapt an old maxim, 'you are what your grandmother ate'. The...

Monkeys Have Undergone Evolution In Facial Appearance To Avoid Interbreeding
2014-06-27 03:34:36

New York University Old World monkeys have undergone a remarkable evolution in facial appearance as a way of avoiding interbreeding with closely related and geographically proximate species, researchers from New York University and the University of Exeter have found. Their research provides the best evidence to date for the role of visual cues as a barrier to breeding across species. "Evolution produces adaptations that help animals thrive in a particular environment, and over time...

2014-06-24 10:21:05

Washington University in St. Louis Scientists have identified a ‘weakness’ in the clover genome that biases species to evolve the same trait Writing about the weird soft-bodied fossils found in the Burgess Shale in the Canadian Rockies, paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould noted that of 25 initial body plans exhibited by the fossils, all but four were quickly eliminated. If we rewound the tape, he asked, and cast the dice once more, would the same four body plans be selected? He...


Latest Evolution Reference Libraries

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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