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Latest Evolution Stories

2014-02-05 11:40:36

Sponges are an important animal for marine and freshwater ecology and represent a rich animal diversity found throughout the world, from tropical climates to the arctic poles. For evolutionary biologists, they also present an interesting animal for comparative study because they are simple filter feeders, and lack nervous, digestive or circulatory systems, suggesting that they diverged early from other animals. To provide a wider framework for understanding the molecular complexity behind...

2014-01-29 11:17:50

Ever since the nineteenth century scientists have recognized that some regions contain more species than others, and that the tropics are richer in biodiversity than temperate regions. But why are there more species in the tropics? A new study publishing 28 January in the Open Access journal PLOS Biology scrutinizes most of the living mammalian species and reveals a two-fold mechanism; the rate at which mammals arose was higher in the tropics, and the rate at which they became extinct lower....

Ocean Acidification Long Term Research
2014-01-28 13:43:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online More research is necessary for an accurate determination of how marine species will cope long-term with ocean acidification, according to a new research review in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution. "We can't measure evolutionary responses in all organisms, so we need to choose carefully to get the most bang for our buck," said review author Jennifer Sunday, a post-doctoral researcher at The University of British Columbia in...

2014-01-27 10:25:54

The evolutionary path from unicellular life to multicellularity is varied, but all lead to complex organisms In the beginning there were single cells. Today, many millions of years later, most plants, animals, fungi, and algae are composed of multiple cells that work collaboratively as a single being. Despite the various ways these organisms achieved multicellularity, their conglomeration of cells operate cooperatively to consume energy, survive, and reproduce. But how did multicellularity...

Engineering Plus Evolutionary Analyses Used To Answer Natural Selection Questions
2014-01-24 14:45:08

University of Massachusetts at Amherst Introducing a new approach that combines evolutionary and engineering analyses to identify the targets of natural selection, researchers report in the current issue of Evolution that the new tool opens a way of discovering evidence for selection for biomechanical function in very diverse organisms and of reconstructing skull shapes in long-extinct ancestral species. Evolutionary biologist Elizabeth Dumont and mechanical engineer Ian Grosse at the...

Bigger Really Was Better For Early Prehistoric Life
2014-01-24 14:38:14

[ Watch the Video: The Evolution of the World’s Oldest Fossil Communities ] University of Toronto A NASA research group featuring University of Toronto Mississauga professor Marc Laflamme has helped to explain why some prehistoric organisms evolved into larger animals. Laflamme, an assistant professor with the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, and his colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Node of NASA's Astrobiology Institute suggest that height...

2014-01-22 12:25:44

Highlights in this week's Molecular Biology and Evolution The baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been associated with human activities for thousands of years, being the primary biological agent in baking, brewing, winemaking and other fermentation processes. It is also one of the most important model organisms in molecular biology and genetics research. For a long time, the history and evolution of this important yeast has been a completely mystery, but recent advances in genome...

2014-01-08 17:11:35

A new study compares the relative rate of molecular evolution between humans and chimps with that of their lice. The researchers wanted to know whether evolution marches on at a steady pace in all creatures or if subtle changes in genes – substitutions of individual letters of the genetic code – occur more rapidly in some groups than in others. A report of the study appears in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The team chose its study subjects because humans, chimps and their...

Researchers Discover Molecular Causes For Sex Determination In Honey Bees
2013-12-31 06:56:40

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online New research appearing in the December issue of the journal Cell Biology puts together the final pieces in a puzzle 200 years in the making – determining the molecular evolution in the genes that separate male honey bees from female ones. Lead author Martin Beye, a professor with the Institute of Evolutionary Genetics at the University of Düsseldorf, and his colleagues studied 14 natural sequence variants of the complementary...

Evolution Of Species Does Not Always Follow Darwin's Theories
2013-12-23 04:19:44

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Evolutionary scientists have long argued that species that live together must evolve in different ways in order to avoid direct competition with each other, but new research published Sunday in the journal Nature suggests otherwise. A team of researchers led by Dr. Joe Tobias of Oxford University's Department of Zoology studied ovenbirds, one of the most diverse families of birds in the world, in order to conduct an in-depth...


Latest Evolution Reference Libraries

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.