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No Bed Of Roses Ten Things To Know About Sunflowers

No Bed Of Roses: Ten Things To Know About Sunflowers

Provided by Cheryl Dybas, NSF As fall fields turn bright with color, what might we learn from roadside rows of sunflowers - and the sunflower seeds widely used to feed birds in colder weather? Scientists are finding that answers to...

Latest Evolutionary biology Stories

2014-10-14 16:26:13

LONDON, Oct. 14, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Use this report to:- Identify the major market trends and the factors driving or inhibiting the growth of the global pharmaceutical antibiotics market and its various submarkets.- Learn about developments of novel antibiotics to combat multidrug-resistant strains.- Gain information on the market structure, various subsegments of the global antibiotics market. Highlights- The global systemic antibiotics market was valued at $39.6 billion in 2013...

Neriid flies
2014-10-03 03:00:21

Deborah Smith, University of New South Wales Scientists have discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother’s previous sexual partner – in flies at least. This confronting idea, known as telegony, dates back to ancient Greek times, but was discredited in the early 20th Century with the advent of genetics. To test it out, UNSW Australia scientists Dr. Angela Crean, Professor Russell Bonduriansky and Dr. Anna Kopps...

multicellular organism
2014-09-26 07:55:55

Rayshell Clapper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For those involved in and interested in the history of life and its evolution - including the inception of multicellular eukaryotes (organism with cells) - Virginia Tech released some very exciting news recently. According to research conducted by Shuhai Xiao, a Virginia tech professor of geobiology, in conjunction with partners from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, there is new evidence that indicates complex multicellularity...

facial differences
2014-09-18 02:00:28

Robert Sanders, University of California - Berkeley The amazing variety of human faces – far greater than that of most other animals – is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, scientists. Our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend, said behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan, a postdoctoral fellow in UC Berkeley’s...

2014-09-17 04:21:26

GLASGOW, Scotland, September 17, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- First antibacterial with a new mode of action from a truly novel class of anti-infective in over a decade MGB Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company developing a truly novel class of anti-infectives, announces today that it has secured GBP4.0m ($6.4m) to advance the development of its lead antibacterial, MGB-BP-3, against a range of Gram-positive infections including Clostridium...

whale sex
2014-09-10 03:00:41

Robert Perkins, University of Southern California New study turns a long-accepted evolutionary assumption on its head, finding that whale pelvic bones play a key role in mating Both whales and dolphins have pelvic (hip) bones, evolutionary remnants from when their ancestors walked on land more than 40 million years ago. Common wisdom has long held that those bones are simply vestigial, slowly withering away like tailbones on humans. New research from USC and the Natural History...

get up and move
2014-09-09 08:58:31

Saurabh Thosar, Indiana University An Indiana University study has found that three easy -- one could even say slow -- five-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries during three hours of prolonged sitting. Sitting for long periods of time, like many people do daily at their jobs, is associated with risk factors such as higher cholesterol levels and greater waist circumference that can lead to cardiovascular and metabolic disease. When people sit, slack muscles do not...

dodo bird
2014-09-04 03:30:00

David Orenstein, Brown University The gravity of the world’s current extinction rate becomes clearer upon knowing what it was before people came along. A new estimate finds that species die off as much as 1,000 times more frequently nowadays than they used to. That’s 10 times worse than the old estimate of 100 times. It’s hard to comprehend how bad the current rate of species extinction around the world has become without knowing what it was before people came along. The newest...

2014-08-26 23:12:40

Just Released Results from 2014 Innovaacom Medical Education Programs Show 99% of Physicians Recommend Attending to Improve Patient Health Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) August 26, 2014 Innovaacom, L.L.C., announced today the results of a series of worldwide medical education conferences that were held from January through June of 2014. The programs were attended by more than 1100 physicians from close to 60 countries who gathered to discuss and share best practices on how to prevent and manage the...

Hybrid poplar trees
2014-08-26 02:45:23

David Gilbert, DOE/Joint Genome Institute One aspect of the climate change models researchers have been developing looks at how plant ranges might shift, and how factors such as temperature, water availability, and light levels might come into play. Forests creeping steadily north and becoming established in the thawing Arctic is just one of the predicted effects of rising global temperatures. A recent study published online August 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics offers a more in-depth,...


Latest Evolutionary biology Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:47:42

John Harold Ostrom (February 18, 1928 – July 16, 2005) was an American Paleontologist who was greatly influential in the revival of scientific research on Dinosaurs. He is best known for demonstrating that Dinosaurs were less like contemporary reptiles but more closely related to large, flightless birds like the ostrich – a theory that holds its ground in the paleontological community to this day. John Ostrom was born and raised in Schenectady, New York. His father was a physician, and...

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

New Phytologist
2012-04-30 15:00:51

The New Phytologist is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust. It covers all aspects of plant science, with topics ranging from intracellular processes to global environmental change. Articles are published in the following categories: Original research articles, Research reviews, Commentaries, Letters, Meeting reports, Tansley reviews. The following topics and subtopics are covered: Physiology and development:...

Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research
2012-04-29 22:59:00

Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research is a quarterly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. It was originally established in 1963, then reestablished in 1994 by John Wiley & Sons. It was published as ‘Zeitschrift für zoologische Systematik und Evolutionsforschung’ from March 1963 to June 1994. It was published by the Academic Publishers’ Association (Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft ) Frankfurt, Germany. The editor-in-chief is Dr....

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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