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Signatures Of Selection Inscribed On Poplar Genomes - Study

Signatures Of Selection Inscribed On Poplar Genomes - Study Shows Evidence Of Genetic Selection

David Gilbert, DOE/Joint Genome Institute One aspect of the climate change models researchers have been developing looks at how plant ranges might shift, and how factors such as temperature, water availability, and light levels might come into...

Latest Evolutionary biology Stories

2014-08-26 23:12:40

Just Released Results from 2014 Innovaacom Medical Education Programs Show 99% of Physicians Recommend Attending to Improve Patient Health Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) August 26, 2014 Innovaacom, L.L.C., announced today the results of a series of worldwide medical education conferences that were held from January through June of 2014. The programs were attended by more than 1100 physicians from close to 60 countries who gathered to discuss and share best practices on how to prevent and manage the...

Long-grain rice plant
2014-08-15 03:12:54

Iqbal Pittalwala, University of California, Riverside UC Riverside-led research could revolutionize hybrid breeding in agriculture Genomic prediction, a new field of quantitative genetics, is a statistical approach to predicting the value of an economically important trait in a plant, such as yield or disease resistance. The method works if the trait is heritable, as many traits tend to be, and can be performed early in the life cycle of the plant, helping reduce costs. Now a...

2014-07-29 23:02:29

In a new study, researchers mated worms of different species and found that the females’ lifespans and number of offspring were drastically reduced compared with females mated with the same species, and cross-species-mated females were often sterile. The researchers showed that the “foreign” sperm had broken from the female’s uterus, prematurely fertilized the eggs and destroyed the ovaries (causing no viable offspring and sterility), and traveled throughout the worm’s body...

New Mechanism Of Drug Resistance Discovered By Scientists
2014-07-29 03:47:02

Marla Vacek Broadfoot, Duke University Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. These permanent mutations were once thought to be the only way for drug-resistant strains to evolve. Now a new study has shown that microorganisms can use a temporary silencing of drug targets -- known as epimutations -- to gain the benefits of drug resistance without the commitment. Though the new mechanism...

extinction event
2014-07-25 04:50:18

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online After nearly 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, the biodiversity of our planet is the highest it has ever been. An international group of scientists warns, however, that it may be reaching a tipping point. The team — consisting of scientists from Stanford University, University of California, Santa Barbara, Universidade Estadual Paulista in Brazil, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, the Natural Environment...

antibiotic resistance
2014-07-24 05:43:55

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Antibiotic resistance could bring about the “next pandemic,” turning run-of-the-mill disease-causing bacteria into nearly untreatable illnesses, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned on Tuesday. Speaking at a National Press Club event, CDC director Tom Frieden said that the common use of antibiotics and other anti-microbial agents over the past 70 years has caused some pathogens to mutate and become...

Swainsons thrush
2014-07-23 02:00:32

University of British Columbia Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent species, according to new research from University of British Columbia zoologists. "Instead of taking well-trodden paths through fertile areas, these birds choose to scale mountains and cross deserts," says UBC researcher Kira Delmore. Delmore harnessed a flock of B.C. Swainson's thrushes with tiny geolocating backpacks to map their routes as they migrated south...

Friends Found To Be Genetically More Similar Than Strangers
2014-07-15 11:59:03

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you’ve ever thought of your circle of friends as a second family, you may be on to something as a new study has found that on a population-wide level friends are more closely related to each other than strangers. Published in the in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study indicated that friends who are not biologically related, may be similar to each other genetically. "Looking across the whole genome,"...

Biologists Link Placenta Formation And Sexual Selection
2014-07-10 03:56:12

By Iqbal Pittalwala, University of California - Riverside UC Riverside research shows fish with placentas are smaller and less brightly colored than non-placental fish Sexual selection refers to species' selection for traits that are attractive to the opposite sex. This special type of natural selection enhances opportunities to mate, the tail of male peacocks being an iconic example. Biologists at the University of California, Riverside have now found that sexual selection and...

Study Of Sociable Weavers Shows Everybody Needs Good Neighbors
2014-07-07 03:56:07

The University of Sheffield A new insight into one of the biggest questions in science – why some animals, including humans, work together to maintain a common good – has been achieved by scientists at the University of Sheffield. Sociable weavers, a highly social and co-operative breeding bird from the savannahs of southern Africa, build the largest nests of any bird, housing colonies of up to several hundred birds that can often weigh tonnes and last for decades. The massive...


Latest Evolutionary biology Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:47:42

John Harold Ostrom (February 18, 1928 – July 16, 2005) was an American Paleontologist who was greatly influential in the revival of scientific research on Dinosaurs. He is best known for demonstrating that Dinosaurs were less like contemporary reptiles but more closely related to large, flightless birds like the ostrich – a theory that holds its ground in the paleontological community to this day. John Ostrom was born and raised in Schenectady, New York. His father was a physician, and...

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

New Phytologist
2012-04-30 15:00:51

The New Phytologist is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust. It covers all aspects of plant science, with topics ranging from intracellular processes to global environmental change. Articles are published in the following categories: Original research articles, Research reviews, Commentaries, Letters, Meeting reports, Tansley reviews. The following topics and subtopics are covered: Physiology and development:...

Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research
2012-04-29 22:59:00

Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research is a quarterly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. It was originally established in 1963, then reestablished in 1994 by John Wiley & Sons. It was published as ‘Zeitschrift für zoologische Systematik und Evolutionsforschung’ from March 1963 to June 1994. It was published by the Academic Publishers’ Association (Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft ) Frankfurt, Germany. The editor-in-chief is Dr....

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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