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Latest Evolutionary biology Stories

New Genetic Study Of Tadpole Shrimps Casts Doubt On The Validity Of The Term 'Living Fossil'
2013-04-02 08:10:15

PeerJ The term 'living fossil' has a controversial history. For decades, scientists have argued about its usefulness as it appears to suggest that some organisms have stopped evolving. New research has now investigated the origin of tadpole shrimps, a group commonly regarded as 'living fossils' which includes the familiar Triops. The research reveals that living species of tadpole shrimp are much younger than the fossils they so much resemble, calling into question the term 'living...

Paternal Cues Heavily Influence Mate Choice In Mice
2013-03-28 16:35:39

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Hybrid offspring of different house mice populations show a preference for mating with individuals from their father's original population Mate choice is a key factor in the evolution of new animal species. The choice of a specific mate can decisively influence the evolutionary development of a species. In mice, the attractiveness of a potential mate is conveyed by scent cues and ultrasonic vocalizations. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary...

2013-03-27 14:12:11

Researchers from Lund University and the University of Oxford have been able to provide one answer as to why males in many species still provide paternal care, even when their offspring may not belong to them. The study finds that, when the conditions are right, sticking around despite being 'cuckolded' actually turns out to be the most successful evolutionary strategy. The study, by Charlie Cornwallis and colleagues, is published 26 March in the open access journal PLOS Biology. In many...

Darwin’s Private Letters Reveal A Deeply Sensitive Side
2013-03-27 09:56:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Charles Darwin is known primarily for his revolutionary theories on evolution and natural selection, but a series of soon-to-be-published letters show a personal, caring and emotional side of the iconic and controversial English naturalist. Some of the more intimate letters being released by Cambridge University´s Darwin Correspondence Project are a series of correspondences with his good friend and botanist Sir Joseph Hooker...

Extreme Algae Thieves Its Genes From Bacteria
2013-03-08 17:34:16

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Some microorganisms have developed the ability to thrive in the most hostile environments on Earth, from the superheated geothermal vents to pools of toxic drainage deep underground. According to a new study in the journal Science, researchers have found evidence one of these so-called “extremophiles” steals its ability to endure extreme environments from the organisms around it. While the ability to pilfer genes from...

Lizards Facing Mass Extinction
2013-03-08 05:14:08

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One adage has held true throughout the whole of global history for every living organism on earth; When faced with a challenging situation, a species must either adapt or die. Researchers from the University of Exeter (UofE) and the University of Lincoln (UofL) believe they have discovered a dire situation for one specific species where its earlier adaptation will likely lead to its eventual death and ultimate extinction. In...

2013-03-08 00:53:45

What do cancer cells, weeds, and pathogens have in common? They all evolve resistance to the treatments that are supposed to eliminate them. However, researchers developing the next generation of antibiotics, herbicides, and anti-cancer therapeutics rarely come together to explore the common evolutionary principles at work across their different biological systems. The new American Academy of Microbiology report "Moving Targets: Fighting Resistance in Infections, Pests, and Cancer" concludes...

Genome Police Undermined By Selfish Gene
2013-03-05 10:58:36

Brown University Biologists have been observing the “selfish” genetic entity segregation distorter (SD) in fruit flies for decades. Its story is a thriller among molecules, in which the SD gene destroys maturing sperm that have a rival chromosome. A new study reveals a tactic that gives SD´s villainy an extra edge. For a bunch of inanimate chemical compounds, the nucleic and amino acids caught up in the infamous “selfish” segregation distorter (SD) saga have...

Fossils Show Anatomy Of Ancient Fuxianhuiid Arthropod
2013-02-28 09:06:34

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international group of scientists led by researchers at the University of Cambridge has made an extraordinary find in South China. For the first time, scientists are able to see through the head of the "fuxianhuiid" arthropod, revealing one of the earliest evolutionary examples of limbs used for feeding along with the oldest nervous system to stretch beyond the head in fossil record. Prior to this find, heads covered by a...

Evolution Of Bacteria Has Become Predictable
2013-02-20 19:24:20

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The principles of evolution are widely accepted, but the causes and mechanisms that drive evolution are still heavily debated. In a new study published in the open access journal PLOS Biology, two researchers found similar or identical genetic mutations can emerge in separate populations of E. coli evolving in different environments for over 1000 generations, leading the team to conclude that evolution can be fairly...


Latest Evolutionary biology Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:47:42

John Harold Ostrom (February 18, 1928 – July 16, 2005) was an American Paleontologist who was greatly influential in the revival of scientific research on Dinosaurs. He is best known for demonstrating that Dinosaurs were less like contemporary reptiles but more closely related to large, flightless birds like the ostrich – a theory that holds its ground in the paleontological community to this day. John Ostrom was born and raised in Schenectady, New York. His father was a physician, and...

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

New Phytologist
2012-04-30 15:00:51

The New Phytologist is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust. It covers all aspects of plant science, with topics ranging from intracellular processes to global environmental change. Articles are published in the following categories: Original research articles, Research reviews, Commentaries, Letters, Meeting reports, Tansley reviews. The following topics and subtopics are covered: Physiology and development:...

Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research
2012-04-29 22:59:00

Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research is a quarterly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. It was originally established in 1963, then reestablished in 1994 by John Wiley & Sons. It was published as ‘Zeitschrift für zoologische Systematik und Evolutionsforschung’ from March 1963 to June 1994. It was published by the Academic Publishers’ Association (Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft ) Frankfurt, Germany. The editor-in-chief is Dr....

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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