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Latest Evolutionary biology Stories

2013-11-19 17:00:07

Why do crosses between closely related species fail to produce fertile hybrids? A new study shows that differences in the levels - not necessarily the sequences - of certain key proteins are crucial in mediating reproductive isolation. Two individuals are defined as belonging to the same biological species, if matings between them give rise to viable and fertile offspring. Crosses between closely related, but already distinct, species produce hybrid offspring that are either inviable or...

2013-11-19 13:16:54

An original model that would explain how regions of the genome that are copied later on facilitate the birth of new genes with specific functions in tissues and organs One of the most important processes in the life of cells is genome replication, which consists of making exact copies of the DNA in order to pass it on to their offspring when they split. In most organisms, from yeast to human beings, genome replication follows a set plan, in which certain regions of the genome replicate...

2013-11-18 23:28:27

The recently republished Biology, Geography and Health Online Magazine GeoScience.net has published 40,188 new abstracts on biological interventions that produce substantial, sustained changes in capacities or functioning of organisms. As a newly established publisher of information on the basic and applied natural sciences, GeoScience.net covers such discoveries from the year 1866 until now. Bad Honnef, Germany (PRWEB) November 18, 2013 GeoScience.net has newly published 40,188 summaries...

Natural Selection Shown To Promote Antigenic Evolvability
2013-11-17 04:46:48

Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online What is more useful? Having a superpower, or the ability to develop a superpower? Evolution, of course, picks the latter. Evolution favors the survival of the fittest. If a trait helps an organism adapt to a changing environment, that trait is favored and preserved by evolution. For example, when insects are affected by a pesticide, some of them develop resistance to it, while others die. Evolution targets these...

2013-11-15 10:31:11

Those of us who want to learn about our ancestors — who they were, where they came from and how they mingled (or didn't) with others around them — often turn to historical records or elderly family members for answers. But a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine indicates that the answers can also be found within our own genes. The researchers compared patterns of genetic variation found in...

2013-11-14 11:26:27

Findings call for a rethinking of cancer genetics Johns Hopkins researchers report that the deletion of any single gene in yeast cells puts pressure on the organism’s genome to compensate, leading to a mutation in another gene. Their discovery, which is likely applicable to human genetics because of the way DNA is conserved across species, could have significant consequences for the way genetic analysis is done in cancer and other areas of research, they say. Summarized in a report...

Signs Of Ancient Bacterial Ecosystems Found In Australia
2013-11-13 05:44:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists trying to reconstruct the rise of life during the period of Earth's history when it first evolved find the task daunting because the planet's oldest sedimentary rocks are not only rare, but nearly always altered by hydrothermal and tectonic activity. A new study, published in the journal Astrobiology, reveals the well-preserved remnants of a complex ecosystem in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old sedimentary rock sequence in...

Secret Of Short Stems
2013-11-12 14:21:25

Max Planck Institute Arabidopsis plants that only reach half their normal height have a mutation in the biosynthesis of the plant growth factor gibberellin The normal height to which plants grow is a critical trait. In the wild Arabidopsis thaliana uses the same genetic changes in the biosynthesis of the growth factor gibberellin to cut its size in half as found in semi-dwarf varieties of rice and barley that have been bred by people. When expressing the same phenotype, various plant...


Latest Evolutionary biology Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:47:42

John Harold Ostrom (February 18, 1928 – July 16, 2005) was an American Paleontologist who was greatly influential in the revival of scientific research on Dinosaurs. He is best known for demonstrating that Dinosaurs were less like contemporary reptiles but more closely related to large, flightless birds like the ostrich – a theory that holds its ground in the paleontological community to this day. John Ostrom was born and raised in Schenectady, New York. His father was a physician, and...

Paleontology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paleontology or Palaeontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life, including the study of fossils to determine the organisms evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and it developed quickly within the 19th century. The term itself comes from Greek palaios, meaning...

New Phytologist
2012-04-30 15:00:51

The New Phytologist is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust. It covers all aspects of plant science, with topics ranging from intracellular processes to global environmental change. Articles are published in the following categories: Original research articles, Research reviews, Commentaries, Letters, Meeting reports, Tansley reviews. The following topics and subtopics are covered: Physiology and development:...

Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research
2012-04-29 22:59:00

Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research is a quarterly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. It was originally established in 1963, then reestablished in 1994 by John Wiley & Sons. It was published as ‘Zeitschrift für zoologische Systematik und Evolutionsforschung’ from March 1963 to June 1994. It was published by the Academic Publishers’ Association (Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft ) Frankfurt, Germany. The editor-in-chief is Dr....

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'