Quantcast

Latest Exon Stories

2010-03-01 15:23:03

STANFORD, Calif. "” Like homing in to an elusive radio frequency in a busy city, human embryonic stem cells must sort through a seemingly endless number of options to settle on the specific genetic message, or station, that instructs them to become more-specialized cells in the body (Easy Listening, maybe, for skin cells, and Techno for neurons?). Now researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that this tuning process is accomplished in part by restricting the...

7eb65f2a9c779304043aa3c5e3c2c8321
2009-12-15 08:25:00

TAU researchers unravel the mysteries of DNA packaging Imagine a huge spool of film containing thousands of sequences of random scenes. Without a talented editor, a screening would have no meaning. The RNA "spools" that make up DNA in our genes need careful editing, too. Genes are composed of meaningful sequences, called exons, separated by meaningless junk sections called introns. In order for cells to produce RNA "” the material that is required to create proteins that are vital for...

2009-11-04 15:00:26

A chemical cousin of the common antibiotic tetracycline might be useful in treating spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a currently incurable disease that is the leading genetic cause of death in infants. This is the finding of a research collaboration involving Adrian Krainer, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and scientists from Paratek Pharmaceuticals and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. SMA is caused by mutations in a gene called Survival of Motor Neuron 1...

2009-10-20 09:28:53

New publication in Molecular Therapy outlines dramatic effects in animals treated with splice switching PPMO, demonstrates promise for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy An exon skipping PPMO has demonstrated dramatic effects in the prevention and treatment of severely affected, dystrophin and utrophin-deficient mice, preventing severe deterioration of the treated animals and extending their lifespan. These findings were published online today in the journal Molecular Therapy and...

2009-06-02 11:46:49

Emotions, popularly seated in the heart, shift with the alternative stimuli of love, hate and emotion.The developing heart requires another kind of shift. The proteins that prompt alternative splicing "“ the mechanism by which one gene can generate a host of proteins "“ must also be dynamic, said a group of researchers including those at Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears in a recent issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Programming...

2009-05-22 10:10:00

The widely-used Affymetrix Whole-Transcript Gene 1.0 ST (sense target) microarray platform, normally used to assay gene expression, can also be utilized to interrogate exon-specific splicing. Research published today in the open access journal BMC Bioinformatics shows scientists how to monitor alternative splicing activity on a genome-wide scale, without investing in new exon microarray technologies.Alternative splicing produces a variety of mRNA transcripts from a single gene by splicing...

2009-03-18 11:20:42

U.S. government scientists say they've developed a successful treatment for dogs suffering from canine muscular dystrophy, paving the way for human testing. The National Institutes of Health researchers said the technology, known as exon skipping, covers up genetic errors by using tailor-made snippets of DNA-like molecules as molecular patches. The scientists said the patches cover up mutant DNA sequences that code for making an important muscle protein. The mutant sequences occur in portions...

2009-01-29 08:58:51

U1, which guides the cell's RNA splicing machinery, 'slides' one RNA base, explaining a mysterious mutationTwo molecular biologists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have uncovered important new details about how a gene mutation causes a cellular editing error that results in a devastating disease called pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). The new findings were published online, ahead of print, on January 25th in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.Typically striking during early...

2008-12-26 06:43:20

An international research team led by Tim Nilsen, Ph.D., a professor of medicine and biochemistry and the director of the School of Medicine's Center for RNA Molecular Biology, has discovered an unexpected mechanism governing alternative splicing, the process by which single genes produce different proteins in different situations. The new mechanism suggests that curing the more than half of genetic diseases that are caused by mutations in the genetic code that in turn create mistakes in...

6203368c4ad1a19865449417c2512cfb1
2008-04-09 09:00:00

Splicing exerts selective pressure on DNA sequenceThe Human Genome Project revealed that only a small fraction of the 3 billion "letter" DNA code actually instructs cells to manufacture proteins, the workhorses of most life processes. This has raised the question of what the remaining part of the human genome does. How much of the rest performs other biological functions, and how much is merely residue of prior genetic events? Scientists from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and the...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
Related