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Latest Exposure therapy Stories

2013-11-07 12:44:30

In order for prolonged exposure therapy, an evidence-based psychotherapy for PTSD, to reach its full potential, any misperceptions or ruptures in trust and communication between therapist and client need fixing, according to a new Case Western Reserve University study. The study, reported in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology online article, “Patterns of Therapeutic Alliance: Rupture-Repair Episodes in Prolonged Exposure for PTSD,” is among the first to examine how...

2013-06-11 21:12:28

From a new study in Biological Psychiatry There is growing evidence that a gene variant that reduces the plasticity of the nervous system also modulates responses to treatments for mood and anxiety disorders. In this case, patients with posttraumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, with a less functional variant of the gene coding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), responded less well to exposure therapy. This gene has been implicated previously in treatment response. Basic science...

Phobia Therapy Ineffective For People With Negative Attitudes
2013-02-27 06:14:02

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Putting aside pop-psychology adages that claim the contrary, simply confronting our fears isn´t always the most effective way of defeating them. Instead, researchers now say that to gain lasting freedom from our deep-seated phobias, we have to change our attitudes towards the objects and experiences in which those fears are rooted. A team of Ohio State University psychologists recently found that among two groups of...

2013-02-12 14:48:59

Scopolamine is an anticholinergic drug with many uses. For example, it prevents nausea, vomiting, and motion sickness. However, scopolamine is re-emerging as an antidepressant, with recent studies showing that scopolamine can rapidly improve mood in depressed patients. In addition, in a new study published in Biological Psychiatry this month by Dr. Moriel Zelikowsky and colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles, it may also be a possible treatment for anxiety disorders....

2010-01-14 20:27:32

Mice and humans with same human gene abnormality behave similarly according to study in journal Science Studying animals in behavioral experiments has been a cornerstone of psychological research, but whether the observations are relevant for human behavior has been unclear. Weill Cornell Medical College researchers have identified an alteration to the DNA of a gene that imparts similar anxiety-related behavior in both humans and mice, demonstrating that laboratory animals can be accurately...

2006-03-29 12:15:00

NEW YORK -- Research suggests that D-cycloserine may be a good adjunct to exposure-based therapy in individuals with social anxiety disorder, a debilitating condition marked by an excessive fear and avoidance of situations in which a person feels he or she will be judged by others, such as public speaking or even eating in front of others. Exposure therapy, which is commonly used to combat social phobia, relies on extinction to treat the fears underlying the disorder. Lead investigator Dr....


Latest Exposure therapy Reference Libraries

Acrophobia
2013-10-21 09:15:37

Acrophobia, derived from the Greek: ákron, meaning "peak, summit, edge”, is an intense, irrational fear of heights. This is a somewhat common fear; between 2 and 5 percent of the general population suffer from a fear of heights, and twice the number of sufferers are female. Like most phobias, Acrophobia is generally attributed to a traumatic incident involving heights; however, recent studies have questioned this theory, due to the prevalence of this phobia. Some studies have suggested...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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