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Latest Extinction events Stories

paleosol in boulders
2014-09-08 07:08:52

Thomas Deane, Trinity College Dublin Geologists from Trinity College Dublin have rewritten the evolutionary history books by finding that oxygen-producing life forms were present on Earth some 3 billion years ago – a full 60 million years earlier than previously thought. These life forms were responsible for adding oxygen (O2) to our atmosphere, which laid the foundations for more complex life to evolve and proliferate. Working with colleagues from the Presidency University in...

Leaf-mining Insects Completely Disappeared With The Dinosaurs
2014-07-28 03:16:19

By A'ndrea Eluse Messer, Penn State After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared. Only a million years later, at Mexican Hat, in southeastern Montana, fossil leaves show diverse leaf-mining traces from new insects that were not present during the Cretaceous, according to paleontologists. "Our results indicate both that...

volcanic eruptions cambrian extinction
2014-05-31 06:19:01

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online This week has certainly been heavy on extinction news. Seth Borenstein's enlightening AP article is one, detailing that the Earth may, in fact, be on the brink of the Sixth Great Extinction event. Citing the loss of species at a rate of 1,000 times faster than at any time prior to the rise of the human race, Borenstein's story states we are toying with disaster and whether or not humans make it out of this alive depends fully on...

endangered okapi
2014-05-31 05:57:42

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Plant and animal species are becoming extinct at rates more than 1,000 times more quickly than they did before the arrival of humans, indicating that the Earth could be edging closer to a sixth great extinction, according to a new study published May 30 in the journal Science. In the study, Duke University biologist Stuart Pimm and his colleagues examined both past and present rates of extinction using the IUCN Red List of...

asteroid impact
2014-04-10 08:39:56

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Earth was irrevocably changed when the dinosaurs were wiped out about 65 million years ago by a massive asteroid, but a much bigger asteroid that struck the Earth nearly 3.3 billion years ago is thought to have shaped parts of Africa. Now, a new study published in the journal Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems has outlined the details surrounding that massive impact, such as the creation of a crater about 300 miles across and...

Amphibians, Dinosaurs Were The New Large Predators After The Mass Extinction
2014-03-20 12:37:13

University of Zurich 252 million years ago the largest extinction event occurred at the end of the Permian age. It wiped out almost 90 percent of all life in water. So far researchers had assumed that the ecosystems gradually recovered from this catastrophe over a long stretch of eight to nine million years and that large predators at the uppermost end of the food chain were the last to reappear. A Swiss-American team of palaeontologists headed by Torsten Scheyer and Carlo Romano from the...

Ups And Downs Of Early Atmospheric Oxygen
2014-02-20 10:41:29

Iqbal Pittalwala - University of California - Riverside UC Riverside research team challenges conventional view of a simple two-step rise in early oxygen on Earth; study suggests instead dynamic oxygen concentrations that rose and fell over billions of years A team of biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside, give us a nontraditional way of thinking about the earliest accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere, arguably the most important biological event in Earth...

Permian Mass Extinction May Have Happened In The Blink Of An Eye
2014-02-11 05:07:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 252 million years ago, the largest mass extinction event in the history of animal life on Earth occurred — wiping out more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of terrestrial species. This included the largest insects known to have inhabited the planet. Scientists have explored many theories to explain the cause of the end-Permian extinction, as it came to be known. Those theories include an asteroid...

Mapping The Dinosaur-Killing Yucatan Peninsula Asteroid Impact Site
2013-12-10 06:29:28

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An asteroid or comet crashed into a shallow sea near what is now the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico approximately 65 million years ago. A firestorm and global dust cloud resulted, causing the extinction of many land plants and large animals, including most of the dinosaurs. Researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) presented evidence this week at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) that remnants...

Extinction Event During End Of The Permian Period Likely Due To Acid Rain
2013-11-23 05:08:21

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online At the end of the Permian period, approximately 250 million years ago, a mass extinction occurred that was so severe it remains the most traumatic known species die-off in Earth's history. Previous research has suggested that contemporaneous volcanic eruptions in Siberia might have triggered this extinction. A new study, published in the journal Geology, reveals that the atmospheric effects of these eruptions could have been...


Word of the Day
barghest
  • A goblin in English folklore, often appearing in the shape of a large dog and believed to portend imminent death or misfortune.
  • A ghost, wraith, hobgoblin, elf, or spirit.
The origin of 'barghest' is not known, but it may be from perhaps burh-ghest, town-ghost, or German Berg-geist (mountain spirit) or Bär-geist (bear-spirit).
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