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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 21:24 EDT

Latest Extinction events Stories

asteroid impact
2014-04-10 08:39:56

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Earth was irrevocably changed when the dinosaurs were wiped out about 65 million years ago by a massive asteroid, but a much bigger asteroid that struck the Earth nearly 3.3 billion years ago is thought to have shaped parts of Africa. Now, a new study published in the journal Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems has outlined the details surrounding that massive impact, such as the creation of a crater about 300 miles across and...

Amphibians, Dinosaurs Were The New Large Predators After The Mass Extinction
2014-03-20 12:37:13

University of Zurich 252 million years ago the largest extinction event occurred at the end of the Permian age. It wiped out almost 90 percent of all life in water. So far researchers had assumed that the ecosystems gradually recovered from this catastrophe over a long stretch of eight to nine million years and that large predators at the uppermost end of the food chain were the last to reappear. A Swiss-American team of palaeontologists headed by Torsten Scheyer and Carlo Romano from the...

Ups And Downs Of Early Atmospheric Oxygen
2014-02-20 10:41:29

Iqbal Pittalwala - University of California - Riverside UC Riverside research team challenges conventional view of a simple two-step rise in early oxygen on Earth; study suggests instead dynamic oxygen concentrations that rose and fell over billions of years A team of biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside, give us a nontraditional way of thinking about the earliest accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere, arguably the most important biological event in Earth...

Permian Mass Extinction May Have Happened In The Blink Of An Eye
2014-02-11 05:07:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 252 million years ago, the largest mass extinction event in the history of animal life on Earth occurred — wiping out more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of terrestrial species. This included the largest insects known to have inhabited the planet. Scientists have explored many theories to explain the cause of the end-Permian extinction, as it came to be known. Those theories include an asteroid...

Mapping The Dinosaur-Killing Yucatan Peninsula Asteroid Impact Site
2013-12-10 06:29:28

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An asteroid or comet crashed into a shallow sea near what is now the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico approximately 65 million years ago. A firestorm and global dust cloud resulted, causing the extinction of many land plants and large animals, including most of the dinosaurs. Researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) presented evidence this week at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) that remnants...

Extinction Event During End Of The Permian Period Likely Due To Acid Rain
2013-11-23 05:08:21

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online At the end of the Permian period, approximately 250 million years ago, a mass extinction occurred that was so severe it remains the most traumatic known species die-off in Earth's history. Previous research has suggested that contemporaneous volcanic eruptions in Siberia might have triggered this extinction. A new study, published in the journal Geology, reveals that the atmospheric effects of these eruptions could have been...

Mass Extinction During The Pangea Integration
2013-11-04 03:21:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The integration of Pangea that began during the early Permian period may have caused the environment to deteriorate, playing a role in the mass extinction event that occurred 250 million years ago, according to research appearing in the most recent edition of the journal Science China Earth Sciences. In the study, co-authors, professor Yin Hongfu and Dr. Song Haijun of the State Key Laboratory of Geobiology and Environmental...

Life-Bearing Oxygen Appeared On Earth Three Billion Years Ago
2013-09-26 07:19:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from the University of Copenhagen and University of British Columbia (UBC) has revealed that oxygen appeared 700 million years earlier than we previously thought. The findings, published in the journal Nature, raises new questions about the evolution of early life. The research team examined the chemical composition of three-billion-year-old soils from South Africa, which are the oldest soils on Earth. They found...

End-Permian Mass Extinction Paved Way For Modern Mammals
2013-08-28 16:19:55

Peter Suciu for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mass extinction certainly sounds like it would be the end of the line, and perhaps even evokes images of the end of the world. However, new research conducted by the University of Lincoln, the National Museum in Bloemfontein, South Africa, and the University of Bristol suggests that the end can also be the beginning. This research, which was published this month in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, noted that the ancient closest...

Ancient Mammals Evolution Mass Extinction
2013-08-14 09:52:22

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online With the continuous expansion of human activity around the world, many species are facing the increasing threat of extinction as their habitats shrink and shift. Yet life on planet Earth has faced even larger extinction threats in the past. A new study int the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B examines how a group of mammalian relatives called anomodonts coped with a mass extinction event of the prehistoric past as a way to...