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Latest Extinction Stories

arboreal mammals in a Jurassic forest
2014-09-14 05:18:05

Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The discovery of three new small squirrel-like species lends evidence to the notion that mammals originated at least 208 million years ago in the late Triassic Period, according to new research appearing in a recent edition of the journal Nature. The research, which was led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History and the Chinese Academy of Sciences, places a poorly understood group of animals that lived in the Mesozoic...

Egyptian Hieroglyphs
2014-09-10 04:54:50

John Hopton for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online So great is the range of artwork depicting animals in ancient Egyptian artifacts that scientists have utilized them to study the ecosystem of the Nile Valley over 6000 years. They concluded that species extinction and reduced ecological stability were caused by a drying climate and growing human population. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looked at a range of artwork detailing large mammals, and...

dodo bird
2014-09-04 03:30:00

David Orenstein, Brown University The gravity of the world’s current extinction rate becomes clearer upon knowing what it was before people came along. A new estimate finds that species die off as much as 1,000 times more frequently nowadays than they used to. That’s 10 times worse than the old estimate of 100 times. It’s hard to comprehend how bad the current rate of species extinction around the world has become without knowing what it was before people came along. The newest...

Homo floresiensis
2014-08-05 06:24:34

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Skeletal remains recovered from the Indonesian island of Flores over a decade ago are not a new species of “hobbit” sized human, but an ancient Homo sapien showing signs of abnormal development consistent with Down syndrome, an international team of researchers claim in a new Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences study. According to NBC News, the 15,000-year-old fossil identified as LB1 had previously been determined...

extinction event
2014-07-25 04:50:18

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online After nearly 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, the biodiversity of our planet is the highest it has ever been. An international group of scientists warns, however, that it may be reaching a tipping point. The team — consisting of scientists from Stanford University, University of California, Santa Barbara, Universidade Estadual Paulista in Brazil, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, the Natural Environment...

2014-07-15 23:08:02

EarthTec QZ was named as one of the Top 10 Water Technologies, as judged and selected by Water Online after a very successful showing at the 2014 Annual Conference and Exposition of the American Water Works Association (AWWA) in Boston during the week of June 8, 2014. Bentonville, AR (PRWEB) July 15, 2014 EarthTec QZ was recognized as best alternative for controlling zebra and quagga mussel proliferation. Following a very successful showing at the 2014 Annual Conference and Exposition of...

3D Map Details Dusty Structure Of The Milky Way
2014-06-23 03:19:28

Royal Astronomical Society A team of international astronomers has created a detailed three-dimensional map of the dusty structure of the Milky Way – the star-studded bright disc of our own galaxy – as seen from Earth’s northern hemisphere. The map will be presented by Prof Janet Drew of the University of Hertfordshire at the National Astronomy Meeting (NAM) 2014 in Portsmouth on Monday 23 June. Dust and gas, making up the Interstellar Medium (ISM), fill space between stars in...

High Tibet May Have Been Starting Point For Cold-Adapted Mammals
2014-06-11 10:14:47

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online Over the past 2.5 million years, the Earth has gone through changes in climate. Warm and cold cycles, some lasting for millennia, have become known as the Ice Age. During the cold cycles, ice sheets covered large areas of the northern hemisphere and as the ice melted during the warm cycles, the glaciers receded leaving huge valleys behind. These cycles also affected the evolution and distribution of animals, including the ones living...

Humans, Not Climate Change, Led To Extinction Of Mammal Giants
2014-06-05 11:08:22

Alan McStravick for redorbit.com - Your Universe online We could be living in a world populated with giant deer, wombats, sabre-toothed cats, marsupial lions and kangaroos but for one important factor: humans killed them all. A new study out of Aarhus University, Denmark's second oldest university, looked back over the past 100,000 years and determined that human expansion and competition, not climate change, marched these and many other large mammals right out of the Animal Kingdom. This...

endangered okapi
2014-05-31 05:57:42

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Plant and animal species are becoming extinct at rates more than 1,000 times more quickly than they did before the arrival of humans, indicating that the Earth could be edging closer to a sixth great extinction, according to a new study published May 30 in the journal Science. In the study, Duke University biologist Stuart Pimm and his colleagues examined both past and present rates of extinction using the IUCN Red List of...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.