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Latest Extinction Stories

The Four Horsemen Of The Apocalypse Are Saddling Up
2012-06-07 12:17:11

Michael Crumbliss Twenty years ago scientists met at the Earth Summit in Rio to examine the climate and ecology of the Earth and man´s impacts. Two decades later 17 prominent ecologists have released a paper summarizing the evidence of the 1000´s of ecological studies undertaken in since 1992. In short they decided that the evidence is overwhelming and consistent. The danger of a catastrophic ecological crash is looming and is far more immediate than previously believed. In...

2012-06-06 23:02:54

Endangered Species blog ℠Endangered Earth Journal.com´ is featuring an interview with Liz Bennett, Vice President for Species Conservation at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), for World Environment Day. Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) June 06, 2012 As part of its ongoing interview series on endangered species, Endangered Earth Journal.com is featuring an interview with Liz Bennett, Vice President for Species Conservation at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), for World...

Iowa Man Finds Woolly Mammoth In Backyard
2012-06-06 12:44:29

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com A man in Iowa has discovered the remains of a woolly mammoth that laid to rest thousands of years ago in his backyard. The man, identified only as John, said that one of his sons found something while walking in the forest behind their property in 2010, and John realized that the object was a bone. “I got down on my hands and knees on the bank, and I could see a marrow line around the edge of this, and I said, ℠Boys, that´s a bone....

2012-05-28 19:22:05

The responsibility for choosing which Australian native species survive — and which go extinct — may ultimately fall to ordinary Australians. The dilemma over how much of Australia we will pass on to our grandchildren cannot be solved by science — but only by society, one of the nation´s leading ecologists, Professor Hugh Possingham, warned today. Prof Possingham, who is director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) at the University...

End-Permian Crisis Recovery Took Earth 10 Million Years
2012-05-28 04:07:34

It took the Earth 10 million years to recover from a cataclysmic event that wiped out 90% of plant and animal life some 250 million years ago, according to new evidence presented Sunday in the journal Nature Geoscience. According to a press release detailing the research, Dr. Zhong-Qiang Chen of the China University of Geosciences in Wuhan and Professor Michael Benton from the University of Bristol discovered that biological recovery from what they dub "the greatest mass extinction of all...

Top Ten Species List Creates Awareness Of Biosphere Diversity
2012-05-24 10:27:34

Ten new species are highlighted in the Top Ten New Species list for 2012, the fifth year for this interesting record. The list, created by the International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University and a committee of scientists from around the world, was released on May 23, the birthday of the Swedish botanist who created the current system of flora and fauna classification, Carolus Linnaeus. Since Linnaeus created this system in the eighteenth century, almost two million...

2012-05-23 23:01:02

Endangered species blog 'Endangered Earth Journal.com' is featuring an interview with Gary Frazer, Assistant Director for Endangered Species at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, on the plight of endangered species. Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) May 22, 2012 As part of its ongoing interview series on endangered species, 'Endangered Earth Journal.com' is featuring an interview with Gary Frazer, the Assistant Director for Endangered Species at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Frazer, who assumed...

2012-05-21 23:01:41

Critically endangered saola face extinction in Vietnam without increased protection Washington, D.C. (PRWEB) May 21, 2012 Two decades after the discovery of the saola — one of the most spectacular species discoveries of the 20th century — the rare large mammal remains as mysterious as ever. World Wildlife Fund (WWF) warns that the species, found in the mountains of Vietnam, faces extinction unless protection efforts are intensified. The saola is a primitive member of the Bovidae...

Endangered Species On Track To Recovery Success
2012-05-20 06:03:56

Nearly 100 endangered species should be on track to meet federal scientists´ recovery goals, according to a new analysis by a national nonprofit organization that seeks to protect the planet´s biological diversity. The Center for Biological Diversity´s review examined population trends of 110 endangered plant and animals protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in every state across the USA, including Florida´s American crocodile, the gray wolf of the Rockies,...

2012-05-17 23:03:17

Endangered Species blog 'Endangered Earth Journal.com' will feature an interview with conservation biologist Tom Lovejoy for Endangered Species Day. Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) May 17, 2012 The Endangered Species blog 'Endangered Earth Journal.com' is featuring an interview with conservation biologist Tom Lovejoy for Endangered Species Day which will be celebrated on Friday, May 18, 2012. In the interview, Lovejoy's message is one of concern for those species in danger of extinction. "Hundreds of...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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