Quantcast

Latest Extinction Stories

Scientific Collections Of Species Important For Preserving Biodiversity
2014-05-23 11:25:20

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In an article published in April in the journal Science, researchers from Arizona State University and Plymouth University in the UK argued that the collection of specimens to confirm a species existence has contributed to the extinction of “small and often isolated populations.” On Friday, more than 60 other international research institutions spanning six continents published a response in Science that cited the significant value...

2014-05-08 08:56:02

As a fresh wave of extinctions sweeps through the ranks of Australian native animals, scientists are deploying their most powerful weapon yet in the struggle to understand and head off the wipe-out. Progress in developing the first nationwide database of Australian mammal observations, and understanding what is driving the dramatic rate of disappearances, will be reported to a national conference in Canberra today. With a hundred marsupial species at risk of extinction across the...

Atelopus varius
2014-04-18 06:29:37

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from Arizona State University and Plymouth University in the UK are advocating changes to the way in which threatened species are identified, due to the potential danger presented to vulnerable animal populations by the so-called “gold standard” of collecting voucher specimens for identification purposes. Ordinarily, field biologists traditionally collect those specimens to distinguish animals and/or confirm that...

La Brea fossils
2014-04-11 04:43:36

[ Watch the Video: Research Shows Climate Change Drove Evolution Of Ice Age Predators ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online For the first time, the authors of two new scientific papers have documented the impact that global climate change had on the evolution of Ice Age-era predators whose remains were discovered in California’s La Brea Tar Pits. The authors of the two studies explain that climate warming helped drive the evolution of creatures such as dire...

2014-03-28 09:31:54

Geneticists and anthropologists previously suspected that ancient Africans domesticated cattle native to the African continent nearly 10,000 years ago. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers has completed the genetic history of 134 cattle breeds from around the world. In the process of completing this history, they found that ancient domesticated African cattle originated in the "Fertile Crescent," a region that covered modern day Iraq, Jordan, Syria and Israel. In their study...

Did Inbreeding Drive Woolly Mammoths To Extinction?
2014-03-26 09:19:04

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Much of what we know about the Mammoth may be challenged after new research from a Dutch team has found evidence that the massive mammal may have driven itself to extinction due to inbreeding. The evidence comes from an unusual feature found in some mammoth fossils taken from the North Sea. This unusual feature suggested to the research team, led by paleontologist Jelle Ruemer of the Natural History Museum Rotterdam, the...

Amphibians, Dinosaurs Were The New Large Predators After The Mass Extinction
2014-03-20 12:37:13

University of Zurich 252 million years ago the largest extinction event occurred at the end of the Permian age. It wiped out almost 90 percent of all life in water. So far researchers had assumed that the ecosystems gradually recovered from this catastrophe over a long stretch of eight to nine million years and that large predators at the uppermost end of the food chain were the last to reappear. A Swiss-American team of palaeontologists headed by Torsten Scheyer and Carlo Romano from the...

Eurasian Beaver Diversity In Question
2014-02-19 09:53:51

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Long-prized for their thick fur, the cuddly Eurasian beaver has been hunted by humans for thousands of years and a new genetic study from a large group of international researchers has found that predation by humans has significantly cut down the genetic diversity of these animals. “While beaver populations have been growing rapidly since the late 19th century when conservation efforts began, genetic diversity within modern beaver...

Construction Workers Unearth 10,000-Year-Old Mammoth Tusk
2014-02-13 10:46:27

Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A rare, 10,000-year-old mammoth tusk has been discovered by a group of construction workers at a private construction site in the south Lake Union region of Seattle. The workers stopped working when their digging unearthed the intact fossil dating back to the Ice Age. Paleontologists believe that it must have belonged to the Columbian mammoth, Mammuthus columbi. The tusk was found on private property, but the Burke Museum of...

Woolly Mammoths And Other Megafauna Suffered From A Loss Of Plant Diversity
2014-02-06 09:29:49

[ Watch the Video: Diet Changes Killed Off Woolly Mammoths ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have put forth many theories on why woolly mammoths and other large animals went extinct around 10,000 years ago, from the devastating effects of a comet impact to overhunting by humans. A new DNA-based study published in the journal Nature has found that the flowering plants these “megafauna” depended on disappeared from northern Asia and North America...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

More Articles (15 articles) »
Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
Related