Quantcast

Latest Extinction Stories

c19586a71fc5e852a7d693c50159b3d51
2010-08-09 12:55:00

Conservationists are scouring the world for frog species that are thought to be extinct, but may just be hanging on. Expeditions to search for the species known as the golden toad will start in the next two months in 14 countries. Amphibians are the most threatened animals on the planet, with one third of species at risk of extinction. Many have become extinct because of a fungal disease that is carried in the waters they live in. Robin Moore, the scientist leading the project, told BBC...

81442c4e739a025e9174bbfccc6767f61
2010-07-29 07:40:00

Genetic investigators say the partnership between people and the ancestors of today's donkeys was sealed not by monarchs trying to establish kingdoms, but by mobile, pastoral people who had to recruit animals to help them survive the harsh Saharan landscape in northern Africa more than 5,000 years ago. The findings, reported today by an international research team in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, paint a surprising picture of what small, isolated groups of people were able to accomplish...

452e364a773c67f0b8696d453f9535eb1
2010-07-23 09:12:04

A study on the effect of global warming on African ape survival suggests that a warming climate may cause apes to run 'out of time'. The research, published July 22 in Journal of Biogeography, reveals that rising temperatures and changes in rainfall patterns have strong effects on ape behavior, distribution and survival, pushing them even further to the brink of extinction. The researchers, from Roehampton University, Bournemouth University and the University of Oxford used data from 20...

ff08a9e9fd9dd038ae5c5e7bbdde17c61
2010-07-20 08:12:39

Incidence of a lethal infectious disease moves at a rate of 30 kilometers per year A killer has been caught in the act: the first before-and-after view of an infectious disease that led to an amphibian die-off has been released by the scientists who tracked it. The results are published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Like a wave, incidence of the fungal disease that wipes out Central American frogs--chytridiomycosis--advances through the...

2e902c60370d5d2f6b891a0df4b586f3
2010-07-11 07:35:42

Since about 1900, when tiger records were first kept, their numbers are the lowest they have ever been, with conservationists warning that the world has limited time to save the species. The World Wildlife Fund announced Saturday that the wild tiger population has now fallen to about 3,200, down from an estimated 100,000 more than a century ago. The big cat species could soon become extinct unless urgent action is taken to prevent further hunting and loss of habitat, experts are warning....

2010-07-07 16:42:53

Faced with threats such as habitat loss and climate change, thousands of rare flowering plant species worldwide may become extinct before scientists can even discover them, according to a paper published today by a trio of American and British researchers in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. "Scientists have estimated that, overall, there could be between 5 million and 50 million species, but fewer than 2 million of these species have been discovered to date," says lead author...

9cc1903d1d801ccd697f66c593c4b3c5
2010-07-01 09:08:18

A new analysis of the extinction of woolly mammoths and other large mammals more than 10,000 years ago suggests that they may have fallen victim to the same type of "trophic cascade" of ecosystem disruption that scientists say is being caused today by the global decline of predators such as wolves, cougars, and sharks. In each case the cascading events were originally begun by human disruption of ecosystems, a new study concludes, but around 15,000 years ago the problem was not the loss of a...

6a0b77998806c277d59a41b251f475131
2010-06-30 08:27:56

Hurricanes, wildfires and influxes of pollutants create disturbances that can put ecological systems under extreme stress. Ecologists had believed that at times like these, competition between species becomes less important as all struggle to survive. But a new laboratory study of microscopic organisms subjected to varying degrees of acoustic disturbance now challenges that assumption "“ and could lead ecologists to reconsider how organisms compete during challenging times. "The...

f31a044a7e553c75923562701497bc6f1
2010-06-27 13:26:23

Home to jaguars, harpy eagles and red-eyed tree frogs, tropical forests support some of the rarest species on the planet and are the most biodiverse ecosystems on land. Understanding why some species are common while others are exceedingly rare has been a challenge in these mega-diverse forests. New results from a massive study at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute show that interactions among community members play an important role in determining which organisms thrive. "Based on...

2010-06-09 14:00:19

Researchers at Yale University have found that the risk of extinction for mountain birds due to global warming is greatest for species that occupy a narrow range of altitude. In fact, a species' vertical distribution is a better predictor of extinction risk than the extent of temperature change they experience, the researchers report in the June 9 issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. "Birds allow us to do the first global assessment of the health of a whole...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

More Articles (15 articles) »
Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.