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Latest Extinction Stories

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2009-11-03 13:25:00

The updated global "Red List" of endangered species on Tuesday showed that more than 1,000 freshwater fish species are threatened with extinction, reflecting the strain on global water resources, AFP reported. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) covers more than 47,000 of the world's species and is the most respected inventory of biodiversity. Among the 3,120 freshwater fish observed, scientists found that 1,147, or a third, are now threatened with extinction....

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2009-11-03 07:52:39

The European mink, Mustela lutreola, is a species catalogued as in danger of extinction, due to the large decline in their population over the past century. It is considered to be one of the most endangered mammals, both locally and internationally. The PhD by University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) researcher, Maria Teresa Cabria Garrido, the title of which is Development and application of molecular markers for the study of the biology and the conservation of the European mink, Mustela...

2009-10-29 10:52:00

BOSTON, Oct. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- Jeff Neterval, founder of the nonprofit The Race Against Extinction, is running in The ING New York City Marathon and will run a portion of the race in a polar bear costume (mile 18-19 and miles 23-26) to raise awareness for the nonprofit and the need to protect our planet's endangered animals and plants. "The Race Against Extinction" is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to educate and raise awareness among children and their families of...

2009-10-19 17:08:56

Algae, not asteroids, were the key to the end of the dinosaurs, say two Clemson University researchers. Geologist James W. Castle and ecotoxicologist John H. Rodgers have published findings that toxin producing algae were a deadly factor in mass extinctions millions of years ago. The research not only provides new insights into the past but also offers a caution about the future. The scientists say that current environmental conditions show significant similarity to times when previous mass...

2009-10-19 14:14:45

Supervolcanoes and cosmic impacts get all the terrible glory for causing mass extinctions, but a new theory suggests lowly algae may be the killer behind the world's great species annihilations. Today, just about anywhere there is water, there can be toxic algae. The microscopic plants usually exist in small concentrations, but a sudden warming in the water or an injection of dust or sediment from land can trigger a bloom that kills thousands of fish, poisons shellfish, or even humans. James...

2009-10-14 05:24:00

ILLINGEN, Germany, Oct. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Underwater photographer Klaus Jost has been pursuing his fascination with great whites, tiger sharks and bull sharks many for years and follows these impressive animals up close in their natural habitat. His incentive, however, is not just to share his unique photographs with the public on his homepage http://www.jostimages.com but also to contribute to the protection of these animals. "I would like to use these photographs of the great white to...

2009-10-13 12:15:00

Conservation biologists are setting their minimum population size targets too low to prevent extinction. That's according to a new study by University of Adelaide and Macquarie University scientists which has shown that populations of endangered species are unlikely to persist in the face of global climate change and habitat loss unless they number around 5000 mature individuals or more. The findings have been published online in a paper 'Pragmatic population viability targets in a rapidly...

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2009-10-04 14:04:07

An infant woolly mammoth that has been frozen for 40,000 years in the Siberian permafrost is so well preserved that there are still traces of her mother's milk in her stomach. Three years after reindeer herders dug up the fossil, Lyuba is going to Chicago to star in a mammoth and mastodons display at the Field Museum. The exhibition debuts March 5 and will be open to the public until September 6. "There's a visceral awe that takes hold of you in looking at a specimen like Lyuba, and the...

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2009-09-23 07:08:03

Sometimes to see something properly, you have to stand farther back. This is true of Chuck Close portraits where a patchwork of many small faces changes into one giant face as you back away. It may also be true of the frogs of Central America, where the pattern of extinctions emerges clearly only at a certain spatial scale. Everyone knows that frogs are in trouble and that some species have disappeared, but a recent analysis of Central American frog surveys shows the situation is worse than...

2009-09-15 12:59:00

WASHINGTON, Sept. 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Today the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW www.ifaw.org) filed a petition with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) to protect two North Pole-residing caribou species under the Endangered Species Act. While caribou, more commonly known as reindeer, are threatened globally by climate change, the two specific sub-species in this petition, Peary and Dolphin-Union caribou, face an imminent risk of extinction. Caribou have been...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.