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Latest Extinction Stories

11b8cd4c925d6d210924534859b2b6711
2009-09-15 13:05:00

One in six Mediterranean mammals are under threat from extinction on a regional level, according to a new report issued Tuesday. The IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species report gathered information from 320 mammals in the Mediterranean region, apart from dolphins and whales. The report marks the first time all Mediterranean animals have been included in the report. The study found that the three percent of the mammals analyzed are "critically endangered," while five percent are "endangered"...

b147308bd3a81503b6b051fa860406331
2009-09-14 15:30:00

If the climate is not quite right, birds will up and move rather than stick around and sweat it out, according to a new study led by biologists at the University of California, Berkeley. The findings, to be published the week of Sept. 14 in an online early edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveal that 48 out of 53 bird species studied in California's Sierra Nevada mountains have adjusted to climate change over the last century by moving to sites with the...

1a156b7c51c47a66a112377e1f4dc4c9
2009-09-04 12:50:00

Google's algorithm for ranking web-pages can be used to determine which species are critical for sustaining ecosystems. Drs. Stefano Allesina and Mercedes Pascual find that "PageRank" can be applied to the study of food webs, the complex networks describing who eats whom in an ecosystem. The researchers, based at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at the University of California, Santa Barbara and at the University of Michigan, therefore adapt Google's PageRank...

2009-08-27 14:42:13

Finding economical and practical solutions for conserving endangered carnivores is a continuous challenge for conservationists. In a study published by the peer reviewed open access journal, PLoS ONE, on August 27th, a team of Brazilian researchers define global conservation priorities that encompass socioeconomic and life-history factors for endangered carnivores.The team, led by Dr. Rafael Loyola, examined four global conservation scenarios for carnivores based on the joint mapping of...

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2009-08-27 06:45:00

The world's leading amphibian experts have come together and for the first time identified two major conservation initiatives to protect the amphibians of the world from becoming extinct. The new coalition of organizations, the Amphibian Survival Alliance, will work together on scientific research and fund-raising to focus on containing the spread of the amphibian chytrid fungus and protecting the only amphibian habitats that contain amphibians that are not found anywhere else in the world....

2009-08-25 11:40:58

Tropical lizards detect the effects of global warming in a climate where the smallest change makes a big difference, according to herpetologist Laurie Vitt, curator of reptiles and George Lynn Cross Research Professor at the University of Oklahoma's Sam Noble Museum of Natural History.  Climate change caused by global warming threatens the very existence of these and other tropical species, the ecosystem and its by-products, Vitt maintains. Vitt has studied the ecology of lizards in rain...

2009-08-14 06:06:22

Several rare species in Vietnam including the white-handed gibbon and tapir face extinction because of a growing appetite for wild meat, experts say. The protection and preservation of wildlife in Vietnam should become a priority, experts told an international conference in Ninh Binh Province's Van Long Wetland Nature Reserve, the Thanh Nien News reported. Dang Huy Huynh, chairman of the Vietnam Zoology Association, said in the past poaching of wildlife met the demand of those living in...

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2009-08-09 08:40:00

New research shows that extinction events tend to "cluster" on evolutionary lineages, wiping out entire "chunks of life" as related species with a common ancestor vanish together. Scientists say the phenomenon can result in the loss of an entire branch of the "tree of life".The findings, while based on an analysis of past extinctions, could also assist in modern conservation efforts.The scientists say the lesson for conservationists is that some groups are more vulnerable to extinction than...

2009-08-06 14:54:19

Global calamities like the one that doomed most dinosaurs forever alter the varieties of life found on Earth, but new research shows that it doesn't take a catastrophe to end entire lineages. An analysis of 200 million years of history for marine clams found that vulnerability to extinction runs in evolutionary families, even when the losses result form ongoing, background rates of extinction."Biologists have long suspected that the evolutionary history of species and lineages play a big role...

2009-07-30 10:45:19

To understand how climate change may affect species survival, we need to understand how climate influences their time-keeping.New research published in the journal Biological Reviews points to time as a major factor in determining whether a species is capable of surviving in a particular habitat.In their paper "ËœTime as an ecological constraint' (Biological Reviews, August 2009), Professor Robin Dunbar of the University of Oxford, Dr Amanda Korstjens of Bournemouth University, and...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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