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Latest Extinction Stories

62be43a6bdb0257c71e4a37b7d04903a
2009-07-02 10:50:21

The International Union for Conservation of Nature reported on Thursday that pledges to roll back the threat to biodiversity by 2010 are beginning to seem out of reach, AFP reported. Jean-Christophe Vie of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) told AFP the goal set by UN parties under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to reduce biodiversity loss by 2010 would clearly not be met. The Swiss-based IUCN issued a report on Thursday saying Earth was hurtling towards a...

3aa04135be3148f1fe65897ed943ed151
2009-06-20 08:50:00

International targets set for reducing biodiversity loss may still be achieved with the help of a new online conservation tool. The new initiative led by the Zoological Society of London brings together information on the world's threatened species and demonstrates that we know the least about the status of animals and plants in areas where diversity is greatest. This means that in parts of the world where conservation planning may be most critical, we lack information to effectively...

22b794bfa2755f487f3afbc0883784581
2009-06-19 05:50:00

Scientists discover early warning signs of ecosystems at risk Scientists have unearthed striking evidence for a sudden ancient collapse in plant biodiversity. A trove of 200 million-year-old fossil leaves collected in East Greenland tells the story, carrying its message across time to us today. Results of the research appear in this week's issue of the journal Science. The researchers were surprised to find that a likely candidate responsible for the loss of plant life was a small rise in the...

02cb7ef97f6996c42a01d2b5be2023c91
2009-06-18 11:10:00

According to new radiocarbon dating evidence, woolly mammoths lived in Britain as recently as 14,000 years ago. Dr. Adrian Lister acquired new dates for mammoth bones that had been excavated in 1986 in the English county of Shropshire. His study published in the Geological Journal shows that the radiocarbon results from the adult male and four juvenile mammoths from Condover, Shropshire, reveal that the mammoths were in Britain for more than 6,000 years longer than had been believed. Experts...

2009-06-04 10:15:06

In a drama played out across the southeastern U.S. in containers as small as a coffee cup, native and invasive mosquito larvae compete for resources and try to avoid getting eaten. One of the invasive mosquitoes, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), can carry dengue fever, a viral disease that sickens 50 to 100 million people a year in the tropics, so this seemingly inconsequential struggle has implications for human health.In a new study in the British Ecological Society's Journal of...

2009-06-03 12:27:36

U.S. scientists are warning of the possible consequences of coextinctions -- the loss of a species as well as the parasites or mutualists that depend on it. North Carolina State University biologist Rob Dunn and colleagues said mathematical models suggest coextinctions are very common, yet there have been few reported cases of coextinction in scientific literature. Since the diversity of parasitic or affiliated species -- which may include viruses, ticks, lice and bacteria "¦ but also...

2009-06-01 15:05:00

Hands wring and teeth gnash over the loss of endangered species like the panda or the polar bear. But what happens to the parasites hosted by endangered species? And although most people would side with the panda over the parasite, which group should we worry about more?In a new paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, North Carolina State University biologist Rob Dunn and colleagues examine the concept of coextinction, or the domino effect of extinctions caused by species loss....

2009-05-28 11:05:27

University of Notre Dame scientists have published a paper that describes a program designed to help save various species from the effects of climate change. The paper, written by Assistant Professors Jessica Hellmann and Jason McLachlan, along with Associate Professor Alejandro Camacho, is aimed at helping policy makers determine when and how to use an environmental strategy known as managed relocation. Managed relocation, also known as assisted migration, is a means of preserving species...

4152eb81d127fc88e7574c9719f6776a1
2009-05-26 07:18:02

Scientists debate if, when and how to relocate plants, animals and insects whose habitats have been damaged by climate change Scientists are, for the first time, objectively evaluating ways to help species adapt to rapid climate change and other environmental threats via strategies that were considered too radical for serious consideration as recently as five or 10 years ago. Among these radical strategies currently being considered is so-called "managed relocation." Managed relocation, which...

2009-05-14 13:37:19

The International Union for Conservation of Nature, based in Switzerland, said Thursday 12 percent of the world's bird species face extinction. The conservation group said in a news release 1,227 species were tabbed as globally threatened with extinction in recent research conducted by BirdLife International. Among them were 192 species that were deemed critically endangered. It is extremely worrying that the number of critically endangered birds on the IUCN red List continues to increase,...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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