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Latest Extinction Stories

Global climate change Will Induce Large Changes To The Plant Communities On Earth
2013-07-02 14:44:09

Aarhus University The forest we are used to looking at is not at all in equilibrium. Since the Ice Age, a number of plants have been 'missing' in Northern Europe, i.e. species that have not yet arrived. The same applies in many other parts of the world. Similarly, there is evidence that -- even today -- it often takes a very long time before plants follow when glaciers retreat, or the climate changes. In future, such disequilibrium will become the norm in the plant communities on Earth....

Ancient Sabre-Like Toothed Predator Had Weaker Bite Than Domestic Cat
2013-07-02 10:13:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Millions of years ago, a bizarre, pouched super-predator terrorized South America with huge saber-like teeth. New research from the University of New South Wales (UNSW), however, shows the Thylacosmilus atrox had a bite weaker than that of a domestic cat. Marsupials in Australia and America are among the closest living relatives of the extinct T. atrox, which had tooth roots extending rearwards almost into its small braincase....

Climate Change Redefines Endangered Species
2013-06-24 12:17:08

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The forces of climate change are redefining what it means for a species to be endangered, according to a new study in the open access journal PLOS ONE. The wide-ranging study from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) found as many as 83 percent of birds, 66 percent of amphibians and 70 percent of corals are highly susceptible to the effects of climate change, yet not currently classified as threatened with...

2013-06-21 13:05:27

As past extinctions show, groups must continually adapt and evolve or they disappear The death of individual species is not the only concern for biologists worried about groups of animals, such as frogs or the "big cats," going extinct. University of California, Berkeley, researchers have found that lack of new emerging species also contributes to extinction. "Virtually no biologist thinks about the failure to originate as being a major factor in the long term causes of extinction,"...

Lepidium Flora Perching On The Cliffs Of New Zealand Faces Extinction Threats
2013-06-17 12:16:09

Pensoft Publishers The plant genus Lepidiums is a small group of representatives of the economically important cabbage family Brassicaceae. Most commonly known as peppercress or peppergrass Lepidiums includes around 180 species worldwide. In a new extensive study, published in the open access journal PhytoKeys, scientists explore the diversity within the New Zealand Lepidiums oleraceum and allied species. Lepidiums oleraceum, is known in New Zealand, as "Cook's Scurvy Grass" because...

2013-06-11 13:25:51

Although scientists have known since the middle of the 19th century that the tropics are teeming with species while the poles harbor relatively few, the origin of the most dramatic and pervasive biodiversity on Earth has never been clear. New research sheds light on how that pattern came about. Furthermore, it confirms that the tropics have been and continue to be the Earth's engine of biodiversity. By examining marine bivalves (two-shelled mollusks including scallops, cockles and...

At-risk Bird Species In Brazilian Forest Is Greater Than Previously Thought
2013-05-30 12:03:58

New Jersey Institute of Technology In a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, a team of researchers led by NJIT Associate Professor Gareth Russell has applied a novel method for linking large-scale habitat fragmentation to population sustainability. "Our goal was to assess the extinction risk for bird species in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, a global 'hotspot' of bird diversity," said Russell. "Based on elevation restrictions and forest type requirements, as well as ongoing...

Well-Preserved Woolly Mammoth With Flowing Blood Discovered In Siberia
2013-05-29 14:17:34

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The dream of bringing woolly mammoths back to life has been a bit of a stretch. But a new discovery in Russia's Far East is providing the best chance of that becoming a reality yet. Russian scientists say they discovered a female Siberian woolly mammoth carcass with flowing blood, in below freezing temperatures in Siberia. While performing the excavation, the team broke ice cavities with a pick pole and blood came running out....

2013-05-24 23:32:37

a Tiger Journal.com continues its three-part interview series with Jean-Christophe Vié, Director of IUCN´s Global Species Programme and Director of SOS - Save Our Species, publishing Part 3 of Saving Threatened Species From Extinction. Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) May 23, 2013 a Tiger Journal.com continues its three-part interview series with Jean-Christophe Vié, Director of IUCN´s Global Species Programme and Director of SOS - Save Our Species, publishing Part 3 of Saving...

2013-05-24 23:32:34

Endangered Earth Journal.com has published Part 3 of a three-part interview series with Jean-Christophe Vié, Deputy Director of IUCN´s Global Species Programme and Director of SOS - Save Our Species. Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) May 23, 2013 Endangered Earth Journal.com has posted Part 3, of a three-part, 4,000 word interview, with Jean-Christophe Vié, Deputy Director of IUCN´s Global Species Programme and Director of SOS - Save Our Species. In the interview, Vié talks...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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