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Latest Extinction Stories

Fossils Used To Classify New Species Of Saber-Toothed Cat
2013-03-15 07:57:50

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The discovery of five-million-year-old fossils has resulted in the discovery of a new genus and species of extinct saber-toothed cat, according to research published in Wednesday´s edition of the peer-reviewed, open-access journal PLOS One. The fossils are part of the same lineage as the Smilodon fatalis, a carnivorous apex predator that could have weighed as much as 600 pounds and had long upper canine teeth, according to...

Bringing Extinct Animals Back To Life
2013-03-15 04:45:55

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The idea of bringing woolly mammoths and saber tooth cats back from the dead has been a popular one, and this concept of "de-extinction" is the focus National Geographic's cover for its April issue. Author Carl Zimmer wrote in April's National Geographic cover story about what scientists have done, and are doing to work on bringing some extinct species back from the dead. Species discussed in the feature focus on those that went...

Lizards Facing Mass Extinction
2013-03-08 05:14:08

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One adage has held true throughout the whole of global history for every living organism on earth; When faced with a challenging situation, a species must either adapt or die. Researchers from the University of Exeter (UofE) and the University of Lincoln (UofL) believe they have discovered a dire situation for one specific species where its earlier adaptation will likely lead to its eventual death and ultimate extinction. In...

Fossils of Gaint Camel Ancestor Discovered In Northern Canada
2013-03-05 15:59:17

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers have discovered the fossilized remains of a giant prehistoric species of camel in the far northern regions of Canada, suggesting that the modern versions of these hoofed creatures are descended from ancestors which lived within the Arctic Circle. A team led by paleontologist Dr. Natalia Rybczynski of the Canadian Museum of Nature found 30 fossil fragments of a leg bone on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, during the summers...

Climate Change And Human Evolution
2013-02-27 07:22:49

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a field of study that remains largely in the dark, we have relied on the voice talent of Ray Romano, John Leguizamo and Denis Leary to instruct our children about life in the time of the Ice Age. While the lessons learned aren´t necessarily accurate, one Bournemouth University lecturer on palaeoenvironmental reconstruction and environmental change seemingly thinks it might be a good place to start. Dr. John Stewart,...

Extinction Drives Plant Biodiversity As Much As Evolution
2013-02-14 08:57:43

Peter Suciu for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche famously said “that which does kill us makes us stronger,” but apparently he didn´t understand the complexities of biodiversity. If he had, he might have noted that extinction could influence biodiversity as much as evolution. This is what researchers at the University of Melbourne and the University of Tasmania have discovered while examining plant diversity in South East...

2013-02-12 14:48:59

Scopolamine is an anticholinergic drug with many uses. For example, it prevents nausea, vomiting, and motion sickness. However, scopolamine is re-emerging as an antidepressant, with recent studies showing that scopolamine can rapidly improve mood in depressed patients. In addition, in a new study published in Biological Psychiatry this month by Dr. Moriel Zelikowsky and colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles, it may also be a possible treatment for anxiety disorders....

Tasmanian Tiger Extinct Because Of Humans, Not Disease
2013-02-01 09:55:41

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by researchers at the University of Adelaide concludes that humans alone may have been responsible for the extinction of Australia's iconic native predator, the Tasmanian Tiger (thylacine). The study, published in a recent issue of the Journal of Animal Ecology, used a new population modeling approach to contradict the widespread belief that disease must have been a factor in the thylacine's extinction. The Tasmanian...

Scientist Calls Clovis Comet Theory Bogus
2013-01-30 20:42:49

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers are contradicting one hypothesis that comet explosions may have ended the 9,000-year-old Clovis culture. The Clovis comet hypothesis was first reported in 2007, claiming a comet initiated the Younger Dryas cold period nearly 13,000 years ago. This period, also known as the Big Freeze, was a brief period of cold climatic conditions and drought, causing the collapse of the North American ice sheets. According to the...

New Study Debunks Claims That Most Species Will Vanish Before They Are Discovered
2013-01-25 11:54:53

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from researchers at the University of Auckland, Griffith University and the University of Oxford has debunked claims that most species will go extinct before they can be discovered. "Surprisingly, few species have gone extinct, to our knowledge. Of course, there will have been some species which have disappeared without being recorded, but not many we think," Professor Nigel Stork, Deputy Head of the Griffith School of...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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