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Latest Extinction Stories

Tasmanian Tiger Extinct Because Of Humans, Not Disease
2013-02-01 09:55:41

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by researchers at the University of Adelaide concludes that humans alone may have been responsible for the extinction of Australia's iconic native predator, the Tasmanian Tiger (thylacine). The study, published in a recent issue of the Journal of Animal Ecology, used a new population modeling approach to contradict the widespread belief that disease must have been a factor in the thylacine's extinction. The Tasmanian...

Scientist Calls Clovis Comet Theory Bogus
2013-01-30 20:42:49

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers are contradicting one hypothesis that comet explosions may have ended the 9,000-year-old Clovis culture. The Clovis comet hypothesis was first reported in 2007, claiming a comet initiated the Younger Dryas cold period nearly 13,000 years ago. This period, also known as the Big Freeze, was a brief period of cold climatic conditions and drought, causing the collapse of the North American ice sheets. According to the...

New Study Debunks Claims That Most Species Will Vanish Before They Are Discovered
2013-01-25 11:54:53

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from researchers at the University of Auckland, Griffith University and the University of Oxford has debunked claims that most species will go extinct before they can be discovered. "Surprisingly, few species have gone extinct, to our knowledge. Of course, there will have been some species which have disappeared without being recorded, but not many we think," Professor Nigel Stork, Deputy Head of the Griffith School of...

Researcher Denies Seeking "Adventurous" Woman To Carry Neanderthal Baby
2013-01-23 12:08:02

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Several media reports popped up around the web over the past day or two saying Harvard Medical School genetics expert George Church was looking for an adventurous woman who could carry and give birth to a Neanderthal baby. But as fast as the stories went up, Church was criticizing them for jumping the gun. He said in an interview with the Associated Press Tuesday that he and Harvard “have no projects, no plans, we have no...

2013-01-16 10:37:00

Ecologists at the University of Toronto and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich) have found that, given time, invading exotic plants will likely eliminate native plants growing in the wild despite recent reports to the contrary. A study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reports that recent statements that invasive plants are not problematic are often based on incomplete information, with insufficient time having passed to observe...

Study Reveals First Ever Images Of Early Tetrapod Backbone And How It Helped In Land Evolution
2013-01-14 08:07:38

[Watch Video: 3D X-Ray Images Of Early Tetrapod Backbone] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Using high-energy X-rays and a new data extraction protocol, an international consortium of scientists have for the first time rendered a 3D model of a prehistoric tetrapod backbone. The new reconstruction has shed new light on how the early animals moved once they made it onto land. One of the main creatures studied was a fierce-looking ichthyostega that lived from 374...

2013-01-01 10:37:37

Provides scientists and policymakers with insights for selecting and managing conservation areas How can a square meter of meadow contain tens of species of plants? And what factors determine the number of species that live in an ecosystem? Science journal has defined this as one of the 25 most important unresolved questions in science, both for its importance in understanding nature and due to the value of natural ecosystems for mankind. The value of goods and services provided by natural...

Australia May Have To Pick And Choose Which Species To Save From Extinction
2012-12-26 14:16:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In an impassioned plea to raise awareness and funding for species conservation, two Australian scientists argue that society may have to prioritize endangered species and possibly allow some of them to become extinct because of a lack of funding for conservation efforts. University of Melbourne professor Michael McCarthy and Hugh Possingham of University of Queensland and Australia´s Council Centre of Excellence for Environmental...

Climate Changes After Mass Extinction Modeled By Researchers
2012-12-22 07:09:20

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While it has long been assumed plant and animal life took a long time to recover following the largest mass extinction to date, researchers from the University of Zurich have discovered new evidence to suggest they may have bounced back sooner than previously believed. The mass extinction in question took place at the end of the Permian geological period some 252 million years ago, and scientists had long believed it took roughly...

Leggiest Animal On Earth Gets Rediscovered
2012-11-14 20:41:51

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online [ Watch the Video: Leggiest Animal On Earth ] Scientists in California re-discovered the leggiest animal on Earth several years ago living outside Silicon Valley. Paul Marek and colleagues provided details of the millipede lllacme plenipes' complex anatomy and its rarity in the journal ZooKeys. The female lllacme plenipes have up to 750 legs, compared to the males who only have a maximum of 562 legs. The scientists said...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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